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Four Freedoms

FOUR FREEDOMS

FOUR FREEDOMS. After his election to a third term in 1940, President Franklin D. Roosevelt began to espouse more strongly the cause of Great Britain and its allies in World War II. An indication of this came in a major speech before Congress on 6 January 1941. In that speech, he urged a world founded upon four essential human freedoms: (1) freedom of speech and expression, (2) freedom of every person to worship God in his own way, (3) freedom from want, and (4) freedom from fear. Two of these freedoms—from fear and want—are mentioned as desirable objectives in the Atlantic Charter.

Charles S.Campbell/a. g.

See alsoForeign Policy ; International Law ; World War II .

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"Four Freedoms." Dictionary of American History. . Encyclopedia.com. 24 Sep. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

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"Four Freedoms." Dictionary of American History. . Retrieved September 24, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/history/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/four-freedoms

Four Freedoms

Four Freedoms: In his message to Congress proposing lend-lease legislation (Jan. 6, 1941), President Franklin Delano Roosevelt stated that Four Freedoms should prevail everywhere in the world—freedom of speech and expression, freedom of worship, freedom from want, and freedom from fear. These were substantially incorporated (Aug., 1941) in the Atlantic Charter.

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"Four Freedoms." The Columbia Encyclopedia, 6th ed.. . Encyclopedia.com. 24 Sep. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"Four Freedoms." The Columbia Encyclopedia, 6th ed.. . Encyclopedia.com. (September 24, 2017). http://www.encyclopedia.com/reference/encyclopedias-almanacs-transcripts-and-maps/four-freedoms

"Four Freedoms." The Columbia Encyclopedia, 6th ed.. . Retrieved September 24, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/reference/encyclopedias-almanacs-transcripts-and-maps/four-freedoms

Four Freedoms

Four Freedoms Expression of war aims in World War II enunciated by US President Franklin D. Roosevelt in his State of the Union address (January 1941). They were: freedom of speech and worship, and freedom from want and fear. These aims were echoed in the Atlantic Charter (1941).

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"Four Freedoms." World Encyclopedia. . Encyclopedia.com. 24 Sep. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"Four Freedoms." World Encyclopedia. . Encyclopedia.com. (September 24, 2017). http://www.encyclopedia.com/environment/encyclopedias-almanacs-transcripts-and-maps/four-freedoms

"Four Freedoms." World Encyclopedia. . Retrieved September 24, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/environment/encyclopedias-almanacs-transcripts-and-maps/four-freedoms