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Edinburgh, treaty of

Edinburgh, treaty of, 1560. The treaty has been claimed as a turning-point in Anglo-Scottish relations. Elizabeth had succeeded in England in November 1558. Mary of Guise, regent for Mary, queen of Scots, faced great opposition in 1559 from the reform party, which begged Elizabeth to intervene on their behalf. By the treaty of Berwick in February 1560, Norfolk agreed to protect Scottish liberties, ships and troops were dispatched, and in June 1560 the regent died. At Edinburgh, French and English negotiators agreed on 6 July to withdraw all troops from Scotland. Though Mary, queen of Scots returned to Scotland in 1561 after the death of her husband Francis I in December 1560, the French had no longer the same incentive to support her, and the outbreak of the French wars of religion greatly weakened their position.

J. A. Cannon

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"Edinburgh, treaty of." The Oxford Companion to British History. . Encyclopedia.com. 17 Aug. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"Edinburgh, treaty of." The Oxford Companion to British History. . Encyclopedia.com. (August 17, 2017). http://www.encyclopedia.com/history/encyclopedias-almanacs-transcripts-and-maps/edinburgh-treaty-1

"Edinburgh, treaty of." The Oxford Companion to British History. . Retrieved August 17, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/history/encyclopedias-almanacs-transcripts-and-maps/edinburgh-treaty-1

Edinburgh, treaty of

Edinburgh, treaty of, 1474. The first firm Anglo-Scottish alliance of the century was concluded by commissioners of Edward IV and James III. The Scottish king's infant son and heir James, duke of Rothesay, was formally betrothed to Edward IV's daughter Cecilia in the Edinburgh Blackfriars, with proxies taking the parts of the infant couple. The alliance has divided opinion amongst historians, some seeing it as a Scottish diplomatic success (which indeed produced five English dowry instalments), others viewing it simply as a device by which Edward neutralized Scotland before his invasion of France (1475). The proposed marriage was never solemnized and war was soon resumed.

Norman Macdougall

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"Edinburgh, treaty of." The Oxford Companion to British History. . Encyclopedia.com. 17 Aug. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"Edinburgh, treaty of." The Oxford Companion to British History. . Encyclopedia.com. (August 17, 2017). http://www.encyclopedia.com/history/encyclopedias-almanacs-transcripts-and-maps/edinburgh-treaty-0

"Edinburgh, treaty of." The Oxford Companion to British History. . Retrieved August 17, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/history/encyclopedias-almanacs-transcripts-and-maps/edinburgh-treaty-0

Edinburgh, treaty of

Edinburgh, treaty of, 1328. The treaty set the seal on the achievements of Robert I Bruce and ended the first War of Scottish Independence. Negotiations were concluded in March 1328 at Holyrood and ratified by the English Parliament at Northampton in May. Edward III recognized the full independence of Scotland, relinquished his claim to Berwick and the borders, and agreed to a marriage between Robert's young son David and Joan, daughter of Edward II. Though the treaty was intended as a ‘final peace’, it unravelled as soon as Robert died the following year.

J. A. Cannon

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"Edinburgh, treaty of." The Oxford Companion to British History. . Encyclopedia.com. 17 Aug. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

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"Edinburgh, treaty of." The Oxford Companion to British History. . Retrieved August 17, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/history/encyclopedias-almanacs-transcripts-and-maps/edinburgh-treaty