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Whig

Whig, English political party. The name, originally a term of abuse first used for Scottish Presbyterians in the 17th cent., seems to have been a shortened form of whiggamor [cattle driver]. It was applied (c.1679) to the English opponents of the succession of the Roman Catholic duke of York (later James II), a group led by the 1st earl of Shaftesbury. The Glorious Revolution of 1688, in which the Whigs were joined by many Tories (see Tory), assured a Protestant succession and the constitutional supremacy of Parliament over the king. Political parties during the 18th cent. were essentially groups of factions allied on specific issues. After the accession of William III advocacy of a constitutional monarchy no longer distinguished the Whigs, and during the reign of Queen Anne they became identified increasingly with aristocratic large landholders and the wealthy merchant interests. Under George I and George II most governments were composed of those with aristocratic connections, loosely Whig. The disgrace of Anne's Tory ministers who negotiated for the return of James II on her death, and the Jacobite risings of 1715 and 1745 stigmatized the Tories as supporters of absolute monarchy, and the Whig ministries of Robert Walpole and Henry Pelham dominated the period. After the accession (1760) of George III there were at first no real issues around which parties could polarize, but a Whig party gradually emerged, united largely in opposition to William Pitt, under the leadership of Charles James Fox. This party became identified with dissent, industrial interests, and social and parliamentary reform, and also with the Prince Regent, later George IV. Whig ministries under the 2d Earl Grey and Lord Melbourne were in power from 1830 to 1841, passing the first parliamentary reform bill. After this the Whigs became a part of the rising Liberal party, in which they constituted the conservative element.

See B. Williams, The Whig Supremacy (2d ed. 1962).

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Whig

Whig originally, an adherent of the Presbyterian cause in Scotland in the 17th century; the name is probably a shortening of Scots Whiggamore. At the end of the 17th century, Whig designated a person who opposed the succession of the Catholic James II to the crown; an exclusioner.

From the early 18th century, Whig was used for a member of the British reforming and constitutional party that after 1688 sought the supremacy of Parliament and was eventually succeeded in the 19th century by the Liberal Party. The name was further applied, again in the early 18th century, to an American colonist who supported the American Revolution.
Whig historian a historian who interprets history as the continuing and inevitable victory of progress over reaction; the term is first recorded in George Bernard Shaw's preface to St Joan (1924).

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"Whig." The Oxford Dictionary of Phrase and Fable. . Encyclopedia.com. 29 May. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"Whig." The Oxford Dictionary of Phrase and Fable. . Encyclopedia.com. (May 29, 2017). http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/whig

"Whig." The Oxford Dictionary of Phrase and Fable. . Retrieved May 29, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/whig

Whig

Whig / (h)wig/ hist. • n. 1. a member of the British reforming and constitutional party that sought the supremacy of Parliament and was eventually succeeded in the 19th century by the Liberal Party. 2. an American colonist who supported the American Revolution. ∎  a member of an American political party in the 19th century, succeeded by the Republicans. 3. a 17th-century Scottish Presbyterian. 4. [as adj.] denoting a historian who interprets history as the continuing and inevitable victory of progress over reaction. DERIVATIVES: Whig·ger·y / -ərē/ n.Whig·gish adj.Whig·gism / -ˌizəm/ n.

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"Whig." The Oxford Pocket Dictionary of Current English. . Encyclopedia.com. 29 May. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

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Whig

Whig (w-) †yokel; adherent of the Presbyterian cause in Scotland (esp. one of the rebellious covenanters who marched on Edinburgh in 1648); exclusioner (opposing succession of James, duke of York) XVII; from 1689, one of the two great political parties in England. prob. shortening of Sc. whiggamaire, -mer, wiggomer (used in the second sense, the expedition being called ‘the whiggamore raid’), f. whig drive + mere MARE.

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"Whig." The Concise Oxford Dictionary of English Etymology. . Encyclopedia.com. 29 May. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

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Whig

Whigbig, brig, dig, fig, frig, gig, grig, jig, lig, pig, prig, rig, snig, sprig, swig, tig, trig, twig, Whig, wig •Liebig • shindig • whirligig •thingamajig • Pfennig • Gehrig •thimblerig • Meurig • oilrig • Leipzig •Schleswig • bigwig • periwig • Ludwig •earwig • Danzig • Zagazig

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"Whig." Oxford Dictionary of Rhymes. . Encyclopedia.com. 29 May. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

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