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fives

fives. The game of fives, in a rough form, certainly dates back to Tudor times, though the derivation of the name is unclear. The essential ingredients are a hard ball, gloves to protect the hands, which are used instead of rackets, and a wall or court. Its modern form derives from versions played at Eton, Rugby, and Winchester, which spread to other schools in the later 19th cent. and then to universities. The first attempt to standardize the rules was in 1877.

J. A. Cannon

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"fives." The Oxford Companion to British History. . Encyclopedia.com. 19 Oct. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"fives." The Oxford Companion to British History. . Encyclopedia.com. (October 19, 2017). http://www.encyclopedia.com/history/encyclopedias-almanacs-transcripts-and-maps/fives

"fives." The Oxford Companion to British History. . Retrieved October 19, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/history/encyclopedias-almanacs-transcripts-and-maps/fives

fives

fives ball-game. XVII. pl. of FIVE; of uncert. orig., but perh.
so called because orig. played by two teams of five persons.

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"fives." The Concise Oxford Dictionary of English Etymology. . Encyclopedia.com. 19 Oct. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"fives." The Concise Oxford Dictionary of English Etymology. . Encyclopedia.com. (October 19, 2017). http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/fives

"fives." The Concise Oxford Dictionary of English Etymology. . Retrieved October 19, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/fives