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Bounty (British naval vessel)

Bounty, British naval vessel, a 220-ton (200-metric-ton), 85-ft (26-m) cutter, commanded by William Bligh. She set sail for the Pacific in Dec., 1787, to transport breadfruit trees from the Society Islands to the West Indies. On Apr. 28, 1789, the ship's mate, Fletcher Christian, led a successful mutiny against Bligh. The captain and 18 of his crew were set adrift in the Bounty's 23-ft (7-m) open launch. By remarkable seamanship they went 3,618 mi (5,822 km) in 48 days, reached Timor in June, and proceeded to England. Some of the mutineers were later captured and court-martialed in England; three were executed. Other mutineers under Christian, along with Tahitian women, landed at Pitcairn Island, burned the Bounty, and founded a colony where all but one were subsequently murdered by their servants. The mutineers' descendants continue to live on the island, where the Bounty's remains were found in 1957.

See A. McKee, H.M.S. Bounty (1961); J. Barrow, The Mutiny of the Bounty (1989); S. McKinney, A True Account of Mutiny Aboard His Majesty's Ship Bounty (1989); C. Alexander, The Bounty (2003).

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bounty (payment made by a government)

bounty, amount paid by a government for the achievement of certain economic or other goals. It often takes the form of a premium paid for the increased production or export of certain goods. The bounty was an important technique of mercantilist economic policy (see mercantilism). Whereas a subsidy is a lump sum given for the purpose of promoting an enterprise considered beneficial to the public welfare, a bounty is given as a gratuity per unit of production. Bounties are usually in the form of direct cash payments. However, bounties can be in a concealed form such as exports relieved from payment of a tax or excise duty, special railway rates, rebates on taxes and import duties, credit facilities, and export credits guaranteed by the government. Effects of an export bounty can be destroyed by a countervailing duty imposed by an importing country. The compensatory export bounty is aimed at compensating producers for duties paid on imported raw materials used in making the particular commodity. Bounties also have been granted by states for the construction of roads, canals, railroads, and other public works, and they have been used by nations as an inducement to army enlistment. State governments in the United States have given bounties for the killing of animals regarded as destructive to livestock.

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bounty

boun·ty / ˈbountē/ • n. (pl. -ties) 1. generosity; liberality: fig. for millennia the people along the Nile have depended entirely on its bounty. ∎ abundance; plenty: we ask that growers share their bounty with others. 2. a monetary gift or reward, typically given by a government, in particular: ∎  a sum paid for killing or capturing a person or animal: there was an increased bounty on his head. ∎  a sum paid to army or navy recruits upon enlistment. ∎ poetic/lit. something given or occurring in generous amounts: the bounties of nature.

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"bounty." The Oxford Pocket Dictionary of Current English. . Encyclopedia.com. 16 Dec. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"bounty." The Oxford Pocket Dictionary of Current English. . Encyclopedia.com. (December 16, 2017). http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/bounty-0

"bounty." The Oxford Pocket Dictionary of Current English. . Retrieved December 16, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/bounty-0

bounty

bounty †goodness, excellence; gracious liberality XIII; gift, gratuity XVIII. — (O)F. bonté :- L. bonitās, -āt-, f. bonus good; see -TY2.
Hence bountiful XVI.

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"bounty." The Concise Oxford Dictionary of English Etymology. . Encyclopedia.com. 16 Dec. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

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bounty

bountyalmighty, Aphrodite, Blighty, flighty, mighty, nightie, whitey •ninety • feisty •dotty, grotty, hottie, knotty, Lanzarote, Lottie, Pavarotti, potty, Scottie, snotty, spotty, totty, yachtie, zloty •lofty, softie •Solti • novelty •Brontë, démenti, Monte, Monty, Visconti •frosty •forty, haughty, naughty, pianoforte, rorty, shorty, sortie, sporty, UB40, warty •balti, faulty, salty •flaunty, jaunty •doughty, outie, pouty, snouty •bounty, county, Mountie •frowsty • viscounty •Capote, coatee, coyote, dhoti, floaty, goaty, oaty, peyote, roti, throaty •jolty •postie, toastie, toasty •hoity-toity • pointy •agouti, beauty, booty, cootie, cutie, Djibouti, duty, fluty, fruity, rooty, snooty, tutti-frutti

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"bounty." Oxford Dictionary of Rhymes. . Retrieved December 16, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/bounty