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curtana

curtana the unpointed sword carried in front of English sovereigns at their coronation to represent mercy. The name is recorded from Middle English and comes from Anglo-Latin curtana (spatha) ‘shortened (sword)’, from Old French cortain, the name of a sword belonging to Roland (the point of which was damaged when it was thrust into a block of steel), from cort ‘short’, from Latin curtus ‘cut short’.

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"curtana." The Oxford Dictionary of Phrase and Fable. . Encyclopedia.com. 15 Dec. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"curtana." The Oxford Dictionary of Phrase and Fable. . Encyclopedia.com. (December 15, 2017). http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/curtana

"curtana." The Oxford Dictionary of Phrase and Fable. . Retrieved December 15, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/curtana

curtana

curtana pointless sword used at English coronations. XIII. — Al. curtāna fem. (sc. spatha sword) — AN. curtain, OF. cortain name of Roland's sword, so called because it had broken at the point when thrust into a block of steel, f. cort, curt short.

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"curtana." The Concise Oxford Dictionary of English Etymology. . Encyclopedia.com. 15 Dec. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"curtana." The Concise Oxford Dictionary of English Etymology. . Encyclopedia.com. (December 15, 2017). http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/curtana-0

"curtana." The Concise Oxford Dictionary of English Etymology. . Retrieved December 15, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/curtana-0