Skip to main content
Select Source:

excess

ex·cess / ikˈses; ˈekses/ • n. 1. an amount of something that is more than necessary, permitted, or desirable: are you suffering from an excess of stress in your life? ∎  the amount by which one quantity or number exceeds another: the excess of imports over exports rose $1.4 billion. 2. lack of moderation in an activity, esp. eating or drinking: bouts of alcoholic excess. ∎  (excesses) outrageous or immoderate behavior: the worst excesses of the French Revolution. 3. the action of exceeding a permitted limit: there is no issue as to excess of jurisdiction. • adj. exceeding a prescribed or desirable amount: trim any excess fat off the meat. PHRASES: in (or to) excess exceeding the proper amount or degree: she insisted that he did not drink to excess. in excess of more than; exceeding: a top speed in excess of 20 knots.

Cite this article
Pick a style below, and copy the text for your bibliography.

  • MLA
  • Chicago
  • APA

"excess." The Oxford Pocket Dictionary of Current English. . Encyclopedia.com. 24 Oct. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"excess." The Oxford Pocket Dictionary of Current English. . Encyclopedia.com. (October 24, 2017). http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/excess-0

"excess." The Oxford Pocket Dictionary of Current English. . Retrieved October 24, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/excess-0

excess

excess †extravagant feeling or conduct; overstepping limits of moderation XIV; fact of exceeding in amount XVI. — (O)F. excès — L. excessus, f. excess-, pp. stem of excēdere EXCEED.
So excessive XIV.

Cite this article
Pick a style below, and copy the text for your bibliography.

  • MLA
  • Chicago
  • APA

"excess." The Concise Oxford Dictionary of English Etymology. . Encyclopedia.com. 24 Oct. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"excess." The Concise Oxford Dictionary of English Etymology. . Encyclopedia.com. (October 24, 2017). http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/excess-1

"excess." The Concise Oxford Dictionary of English Etymology. . Retrieved October 24, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/excess-1

excess

excessacquiesce, address, assess, Bess, bless, bouillabaisse, caress, cess, chess, coalesce, compress, confess, convalesce, cress, deliquesce, digress, dress, duchesse, duress, effervesce, effloresce, evanesce, excess, express, fess, finesse, fluoresce, guess, Hesse, impress, incandesce, intumesce, jess, largesse, less, manageress, mess, ness, noblesse, obsess, oppress, outguess, phosphoresce, politesse, possess, press, priestess, princess, process, profess, progress, prophetess, regress, retrogress, stress, success, suppress, tendresse, top-dress, transgress, tress, tristesse, underdress, vicomtesse, yes •Jewess • shepherdess • Borges •battledress • Mudéjares • headdress •protectress • egress • ingress •minidress • nightdress • congress •sundress • procuress • murderess •letterpress • watercress • shirtdress •access

Cite this article
Pick a style below, and copy the text for your bibliography.

  • MLA
  • Chicago
  • APA

"excess." Oxford Dictionary of Rhymes. . Encyclopedia.com. 24 Oct. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"excess." Oxford Dictionary of Rhymes. . Encyclopedia.com. (October 24, 2017). http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/excess

"excess." Oxford Dictionary of Rhymes. . Retrieved October 24, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/excess