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Jade

Jade

A term covering minerals of varied color and chemical composition, credited with occult properties. Jade may be jadeite, nephrite, or chloromelanite, with a range of colorsblack, brown, red, lavender, blue, green, yellow, or white. The mineral is found mainly in New Zealand, Mexico, Central America, and China. In prehistoric times jade was used for utensils and weapons, but in Mexico, Egypt, and China it was employed in burial rites. In China, Burma, and India, jade is used for amulets.

Jade is chiefly associated with China, where it has been carved into ornaments for thousands of years. The blue variety of jade was traditionally associated with the heavens, and Chinese emperors were said to have made contact with heaven through a disk of white jade. There was a Chinese superstition that rubbing a piece of jade in the hand would bring good fortune to any decision or business venture. The Chinese word for jade is yü, indicating beauty, nobility, and purity. Because of its yang (masculine, hot, active) qualities, jade is believed to prolong life. It is taken medicinally in water or wine, and is believed to protect against heat and cold, hunger and thirst. Powdered jade is taken to strengthen the heart, lungs, and voice. It is also considered an indicator of health and fortune, becoming dull and lusterless when its owner experiences ill health or misfortune.

In Burma, Tibet, and India, jade is considered a cure for heart trouble and a means of deflecting lightning. It has the property of bringing rain, mist, or snow when thrown into water. In Scotland it has been used as a touchstone to cure illness. The carving of jade into beautiful ornaments reached its peak in China, where even a small carving involved skilled and patient work over several months. There is still a large jade market in Hong Kong.

Sources:

Laufer, Berthold, Jade: A Study in Chinese Archeology and Religion. 2nd edition. South Pasadena, Calif.: Perkin, 1946.

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jade

jade, common name for either of two minerals used as gems. The rarer variety of jade is jadeite, a sodium aluminum silicate, NaAl(SiO3)2, usually white or green in color; the green variety is the more valuable. The commoner and less costly variety of jade is nephrite, a calcium magnesium iron silicate of varying composition, white to dark green in color. Jade has been prized by the Chinese and Japanese, as well as by pre-Colombian Mesoamerican peoples, as the most precious of all gems. The Chinese in particular are known for the objets d'art they carve from it, and they traditionally associated it with the five cardinal virtues: charity, modesty, courage, justice, and wisdom; they also attributed healing powers to it. It was much used for implements by ancient peoples, especially in Mexico, Switzerland, France, Greece, Egypt, Asia Minor, and New Zealand. Jadeite is found in upper Myanmar, in Japan, and in Guatemala; nephrite in New Zealand, Turkistan, Siberia, China, Silesia, Wyoming, California, and British Columbia.

See S. C. Nott, Chinese Jade throughout the Ages (2d ed. 1962); R. Gump, Jade (1962); J. M. Hartman, Chinese Jade of Five Centuries (1969, repr. 1987); G. Wills, Jade of the East (1972); A. Levy and C. Scott-Clark, The Stone of Heaven (2002).

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jade

jade1 / jād/ • n. a hard, typically green stone used for ornaments and implements and consisting of the minerals jadeite or nephrite. ∎  an ornament made of this. ∎  (also jade green) a light bluish-green: [as adj.] a baggy jade T-shirt. jade2 • n. archaic 1. a bad-tempered or disreputable woman. 2. an inferior or worn-out horse.

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jade

jade a hard, typically green stone used for ornaments and implements and consisting of the minerals jadeite or nephrite. The word is recorded from the late 16th century, and comes via French from Spanish piedra de ijada ‘stone of the flank’ (i.e., stone for colic, which it was believed to cure).

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jade

jade Semi-precious silicate mineral of two major types: jadeite, which is often translucent; and nephrite, which has a waxy quality. Both types are extremely hard. Jade is found mainly in Burma and comes in many colours, most commonly green and white. Hardness 5–6; r.d. 3–3.4.

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jade

jade2 hard mineral. XVIII. — F.; le jade was for earlier l'ejade — Sp. ijada (in piedra de ijada ‘colic stone’) :- Rom. *iliata, f. L. ilia flanks.

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"jade." The Concise Oxford Dictionary of English Etymology. . Encyclopedia.com. 18 Aug. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

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jade

jade1 poor or worn-out horse XIV; reprehensible woman or girl XVI. of unkn. orig.

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jade

jade See JADEITE.

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jade

jadeabrade, afraid, aid, aide, ambuscade, arcade, balustrade, barricade, Belgrade, blade, blockade, braid, brigade, brocade, cannonade, carronade, cascade, cavalcade, cockade, colonnade, crusade, dissuade, downgrade, enfilade, esplanade, evade, fade, fusillade, glade, grade, grenade, grillade, handmade, harlequinade, homemade, invade, jade, lade, laid, lemonade, limeade, made, maid, man-made, marinade, masquerade, newlaid, orangeade, paid, palisade, parade, pasquinade, persuade, pervade, raid, serenade, shade, Sinéad, spade, staid, stockade, stock-in-trade, suede, tailor-made, they'd, tirade, trade, Ubaid, underpaid, undismayed, unplayed, unsprayed, unswayed, upbraid, upgrade, wade •nightshade • renegade • decade •Medicaid • motorcade • switchblade •Adelaide • accolade • rollerblade •marmalade • razor blade • handmaid •barmaid • Teasmade • milkmaid •dairymaid • bridesmaid • housemaid •chambermaid •parlourmaid (US parlormaid) •mermaid • nursemaid • escapade •ram raid • centigrade • multigrade •comrade • retrograde • lampshade •eyeshade • sunshade

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