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natural

nat·u·ral / ˈnachərəl/ • adj. 1. existing in or caused by nature; not made or caused by humankind: carrots contain a natural antiseptic that fights bacteria | natural disasters such as earthquakes. ∎  (of fabric) having a color characteristic of the unbleached and undyed state; off-white. 2. of or in agreement with the character or makeup of, or circumstances surrounding, someone or something: sharks have no natural enemies. ∎  (of a person) born with a particular skill, quality, or ability: he was a natural entertainer. ∎  (of a skill, quality, or ability) coming instinctively to a person; innate: writing appears to demand muscular movements that are not natural to children. ∎  (of a person or their behavior) relaxed and unaffected; spontaneous: he replied with too much nonchalance to sound natural. ∎  occurring as a matter of course and without debate; inevitable: Ken was a natural choice for coach. ∎  (of law or justice) based on innate moral sense; instinctively felt to be right and fair.See also natural law. ∎  Bridge (of a bid) straightforwardly reflecting one's holding of cards. Often contrasted with conventional or artificial. 3. (of a parent or child) related by blood: such adopted children always knew who their natural parents were. ∎ chiefly archaic illegitimate: the Baron left a natural son by his mistress. 4. Mus. (of a note) not sharped or flatted: [in comb.] the bassoon plays G-natural instead of A-flat. ∎  (of a brass instrument) having no valves and able to play only the notes of the harmonic series above a fundamental note. ∎  of or relating to the notes and intervals of the harmonic series. 5. Christian Theol. relating to earthly or unredeemed human or physical nature as distinct from the spiritual or supernatural realm. • n. 1. a person regarded as having an innate gift or talent for a particular task or activity: she was a natural for the sort of television work required of her. ∎  a thing that is particularly suited for something: perky musical accompaniment would seem a natural for this series. 2. Mus. a sign (♮) denoting a natural note when a previous sign or the key signature would otherwise demand a sharp or a flat. ∎  a natural note. ∎  any of the longer keys on a keyboard instrument that are normally white. 3. a creamy beige color. 4. a hand of cards, throw of dice, or other result that wins immediately, in particular: ∎  a hand of two cards making 21 in the first deal in blackjack and similar games. ∎  a first throw of 7 or 11 at craps. 5. Fishing an insect or other small creature used as bait, rather than an artificial imitation. 6. dated, offens. a person mentally handicapped from birth. • adv. inf. or dial. naturally: keep walking—just act natural. DERIVATIVES: nat·u·ral·ness n.

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"natural." The Oxford Pocket Dictionary of Current English. . Encyclopedia.com. 22 Aug. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"natural." The Oxford Pocket Dictionary of Current English. . Encyclopedia.com. (August 22, 2017). http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/natural-1

"natural." The Oxford Pocket Dictionary of Current English. . Retrieved August 22, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/natural-1

natural

natural A term that is applied to a community of native plants and animals. ‘Future-natural’ describes the community that would develop were human influences to be removed completely and permanently, but allows for possible changes in climate or site. ‘Original-natural’ describes a community as it existed in the past, with no modification by humans. ‘Past-natural’ describes the condition in which the present features are derived directly from those existing originally, with relatively little modification by humans. ‘Potential-natural’ describes the community that would develop were human influence removed, but the consequent succession completed instantly (future changes in climate or site are not taken into account). ‘Present-natural’ describes the community that would exist now had there been no human modification. Because of the dynamic nature of any ecosystem, this condition may not be identical to the last original-natural state before human intervention began.

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"natural." A Dictionary of Ecology. . Encyclopedia.com. 22 Aug. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"natural." A Dictionary of Ecology. . Encyclopedia.com. (August 22, 2017). http://www.encyclopedia.com/science/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/natural

"natural." A Dictionary of Ecology. . Retrieved August 22, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/science/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/natural

natural

natural A term that is applied to a community of native plants and animals. ‘Future-natural’ describes the community that would develop were human influences to be removed completely and permanently, but allows for possible changes in climate or site. ‘Original-natural’ describes a community as it existed in the past, with no modification by humans. ‘Past-natural’ describes the condition in which the present features are derived directly from those existing originally, with relatively little modification by humans. ‘Potential-natural’ describes the community that would develop were human influence removed, but the consequent succession completed instantly (future changes in climate or site are not taken into account). ‘Present-natural’ describes the community that would exist now had there been no human modification. Because of the dynamic nature of any ecosystem, this condition may not be identical to the last original-natural state before human intervention began.

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"natural." A Dictionary of Plant Sciences. . Encyclopedia.com. 22 Aug. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"natural." A Dictionary of Plant Sciences. . Encyclopedia.com. (August 22, 2017). http://www.encyclopedia.com/science/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/natural-0

"natural." A Dictionary of Plant Sciences. . Retrieved August 22, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/science/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/natural-0

natural

natural large as life, and twice as natural used for an emphatic assertion of presence or existence; originally as a quotation from Lewis Carroll's Through the Looking-Glass (1872), as a description of Alice by the Anglo-Saxon Messenger.
natural science a branch of science which deals with the physical world, e.g. physics, chemistry, geology, biology; the branch of knowledge which deals with the study of the physical world.
natural selection the process whereby organisms better adapted to their environment tend to survive and produce more offspring. The theory of its action was first fully expounded by Charles Darwin and it is now believed to be the main process that brings about evolution.

See also natural astrology.

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"natural." The Oxford Dictionary of Phrase and Fable. . Encyclopedia.com. 22 Aug. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"natural." The Oxford Dictionary of Phrase and Fable. . Encyclopedia.com. (August 22, 2017). http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/natural

"natural." The Oxford Dictionary of Phrase and Fable. . Retrieved August 22, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/natural

natural

natural.
1. A note that is neither raised (‘sharpened’) nor lowered (‘flattened’).

2. The sign ♮, which, after a note has been raised by a sharp or double-sharp, or lowered by a flat or double-flat, restores it to its orig. pitch. After a double-sharp or double-flat the change to a single one is sometimes indicated ♮♯ or ♮♭ (at other times by the single accidental).

3. Type of harmonic in str.-playing.

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"natural." The Concise Oxford Dictionary of Music. . Encyclopedia.com. 22 Aug. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"natural." The Concise Oxford Dictionary of Music. . Encyclopedia.com. (August 22, 2017). http://www.encyclopedia.com/arts/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/natural

"natural." The Concise Oxford Dictionary of Music. . Retrieved August 22, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/arts/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/natural

natural

natural In musical notation, an accidental sign placed before a note; it cancels a sharp or flat that would otherwise affect the note. It is designated by the sign ♮.

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"natural." World Encyclopedia. . Encyclopedia.com. 22 Aug. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"natural." World Encyclopedia. . Encyclopedia.com. (August 22, 2017). http://www.encyclopedia.com/environment/encyclopedias-almanacs-transcripts-and-maps/natural

"natural." World Encyclopedia. . Retrieved August 22, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/environment/encyclopedias-almanacs-transcripts-and-maps/natural

natural

naturalapparel, barrel, carol, Carole, carrel, Carroll, Darrell, Darryl, Farrell •gambrel • spandrel •astral, plastral •cracker-barrel •Errol, feral •petrel, petrol •spectral •central, epicentral, ventral •ancestral, kestrel, orchestral •dextral • Sacheverell • mayoral •sacral • wastrel • cerebral •anhedral, cathedral, dihedral, tetrahedral •hypaethral (US hypethral), urethral •squirrel, Tyrol, Wirral •timbrel, whimbrel •minstrel • arbitral • sinistral • integral •triumviral •spiral, viral •amoral, Balmoral, coral, immoral, laurel, moral, quarrel, sorel, sorrel •cockerel, Cockerell •dotterel • rostral •aboral, aural, choral, floral, goral, oral •austral, claustral •scoundrel • cloistral • neutral • figural •augural •demurral, Durrell •mongrel • sepulchral • lustral •spheral • retiral •crural, jural, mural, neural, plural, rural •illiberal, liberal •natural • federal • peripheral •doggerel • mackerel • pickerel •bicameral, unicameral •admiral •ephemeral, femoral •humeral, numeral •general • mineral • funeral •spatio-temporal, temporal •corporal • tesseral • visceral •bilateral, collateral, equilateral, lateral, multilateral, quadrilateral, trilateral, unilateral •pastoral •electoral, pectoral, prefectoral, protectoral •clitoral, literal, littoral, presbyteral •dipteral, peripteral •doctoral • several • behavioural •conferral, deferral, referral, transferral

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"natural." Oxford Dictionary of Rhymes. . Encyclopedia.com. 22 Aug. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"natural." Oxford Dictionary of Rhymes. . Encyclopedia.com. (August 22, 2017). http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/natural-0

"natural." Oxford Dictionary of Rhymes. . Retrieved August 22, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/natural-0