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eutrophic

eutrophic Describing a body of water (e.g. a lake) with an abundant supply of nutrients and a high rate of formation of organic matter by photosynthesis. Pollution of a lake by sewage or fertilizers renders it eutrophic (a process called eutrophication). This stimulates excessive growth of algae (see algal bloom); the death and subsequent decomposition of these increases the biochemical oxygen demand and thus depletes the oxygen content of the lake, resulting in the death of the lake's fish and other animals. Compare dystrophic; mesotrophic; oligotrophic.

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"eutrophic." A Dictionary of Biology. . Encyclopedia.com. 18 Dec. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"eutrophic." A Dictionary of Biology. . Encyclopedia.com. (December 18, 2017). http://www.encyclopedia.com/science/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/eutrophic-2

"eutrophic." A Dictionary of Biology. . Retrieved December 18, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/science/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/eutrophic-2

eutrophic

eutrophic Originally applied to nutrient-rich waters with high primary productivity but now also applied to soils. Typically, eutrophic lakes are shallow, with a dense plankton population and well-developed littoral vegetation. The high organic content may mean that in summer, when there is stagnation resulting from thermal stratification, oxygen supplies in the hypolimnion become limiting for some fish species, e.g. trout. Compare OLIGOTROPHIC.

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"eutrophic." A Dictionary of Plant Sciences. . Encyclopedia.com. 18 Dec. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"eutrophic." A Dictionary of Plant Sciences. . Encyclopedia.com. (December 18, 2017). http://www.encyclopedia.com/science/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/eutrophic-1

"eutrophic." A Dictionary of Plant Sciences. . Retrieved December 18, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/science/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/eutrophic-1

eutrophic

eutrophic Originally applied to nutrientrich waters with high primary productivity but now also applied to soils. Typically, eutrophic lakes are shallow, with a dense plankton population and well-developed littoral vegetation. The high organic content may mean that in summer, when there is stagnation caused by thermal stratification, oxygen supplies in the hypolimnion become limiting for some fish species (e.g. trout). Compare oligotrophic.

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"eutrophic." A Dictionary of Ecology. . Encyclopedia.com. 18 Dec. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"eutrophic." A Dictionary of Ecology. . Encyclopedia.com. (December 18, 2017). http://www.encyclopedia.com/science/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/eutrophic-0

"eutrophic." A Dictionary of Ecology. . Retrieved December 18, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/science/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/eutrophic-0

eutrophic

eu·troph·ic / yoōˈträfik; -trō-/ • adj. Ecol. (of a lake or other body of water) rich in nutrients and so supporting a dense plant population, the decomposition of which kills animal life by depriving it of oxygen.

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"eutrophic." The Oxford Pocket Dictionary of Current English. . Encyclopedia.com. 18 Dec. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"eutrophic." The Oxford Pocket Dictionary of Current English. . Encyclopedia.com. (December 18, 2017). http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/eutrophic

"eutrophic." The Oxford Pocket Dictionary of Current English. . Retrieved December 18, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/eutrophic

eutrophic

eutrophic Applied to nutrient-rich waters with high primary productivity. Compare OLIGOTROPHIC.

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"eutrophic." A Dictionary of Earth Sciences. . Encyclopedia.com. 18 Dec. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"eutrophic." A Dictionary of Earth Sciences. . Encyclopedia.com. (December 18, 2017). http://www.encyclopedia.com/science/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/eutrophic

"eutrophic." A Dictionary of Earth Sciences. . Retrieved December 18, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/science/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/eutrophic