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storm

storm / stôrm/ • n. 1. a violent disturbance of the atmosphere with strong winds and usually rain, thunder, lightning, or snow. ∎  (also storm system) an intense low-pressure weather system; a cyclone. ∎  a wind of force 10 on the Beaufort scale (48–55 knots or 55-63 mph). ∎  a heavy discharge of missiles or blows: two men were taken by a storm of bullets. 2. [usu. in sing.] a tumultuous reaction; an uproar or controversy: the book caused a storm in South America she has been at the center of a storm concerning payments. ∎  a violent or noisy outburst of a specified feeling or reaction: the disclosure raised a storm of protest. 3. (storms) storm windows. 4. a direct assault by troops on a fortified place. • v. 1. [intr.] move angrily or forcefully in a specified direction: she burst into tears and stormed off he stormed out of the house. ∎  [with direct speech] shout (something) angrily; rage: “Don't patronize me!” she stormed. ∎  move forcefully and decisively to a specified position in a game or contest: he barged past and stormed to the checkered flag. 2. [tr.] (of troops) suddenly attack and capture (a building or other place) by means of force: Indian commandos stormed a hijacked plane early today | [as n.] (storming) the storming of the Bastille. 3. [intr.] (of the weather) be violent, with strong winds and usually rain, thunder, lightning, or snow: when it stormed in the day, I shoveled the drive before Harry came home. PHRASES: the calm (or lull) before the storm a period of unusual tranquility or stability that seems likely to presage difficult times. storm and stressanother term for Sturm und Drang. a storm in a teacupBritish term for a tempest in a teapot (see tempest). take something by storm (of troops) capture a place by a sudden and violent attack. ∎  have great and rapid success in a particular place or with a particular group of people: his first collection took the fashion world by storm. —— up a storm perform the specified action with great enthusiasm and energy: the band could really play up a storm.DERIVATIVES: storm·proof / -ˌproōf/ adj.

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"storm." The Oxford Pocket Dictionary of Current English. . Encyclopedia.com. 22 Jun. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"storm." The Oxford Pocket Dictionary of Current English. . Encyclopedia.com. (June 22, 2017). http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/storm-0

"storm." The Oxford Pocket Dictionary of Current English. . Retrieved June 22, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/storm-0

storm

storm, disturbance of the ordinary conditions of the atmosphere attended by wind, rain, snow, sleet, hail, or thunder and lightning. Types of storms include the extratropical cyclone, the common, large-scale storm of temperate latitudes; the tropical cyclone, or hurricane, which is somewhat smaller in area than the former and accompanied by high winds and heavy rains; the tornado, or "twister," a small but intense storm with very high winds, usually of limited duration; and the thunderstorm, local in nature and accompanied by brief but heavy rain showers and often by hail. The term storm is also applied to blizzards, sandstorms, and dust storms, in which high wind is the dominant meteorological element.

A storm surge, sometimes called a tidal wave, is a flood of ocean or lake water that occurs in areas subject to tropical storms and bordering on shallow waters, but any strong low-pressure system in a coastal area, such as a northeaster along the Atlantic coast of North America, may produce a storm surge. Storm surges are due mostly to wind, which pushes the water ahead of a storm. In Galveston, Tex., in 1900 a hurricane with a wind velocity of more than 100 mi (160 km) per hr caused an ocean storm surge 15 ft (5 m) above normal high tide levels that flooded coastal areas, resulting in the loss of thousands of lives and extensive property damage. The highest storm surge on record in the United States is that caused by Hurricane Katrina (2005), which had sustained winds at landfall in SE Louisiana of more than 140 mi (225 km) per hr and a storm surge that by one estimate reached 29 ft (8.8 m) on the SW Mississippi coast and caused coastal devastation from SE Louisiana to Alabama.

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"storm." The Columbia Encyclopedia, 6th ed.. . Encyclopedia.com. 22 Jun. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"storm." The Columbia Encyclopedia, 6th ed.. . Encyclopedia.com. (June 22, 2017). http://www.encyclopedia.com/reference/encyclopedias-almanacs-transcripts-and-maps/storm

"storm." The Columbia Encyclopedia, 6th ed.. . Retrieved June 22, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/reference/encyclopedias-almanacs-transcripts-and-maps/storm

Storm

Storm

a shower or flight of objects; a passionate outburst.

Examples : storm of applause, 1832; of arrows, 1667; of blows, 1817; of bullets, 1615; of eloquence, 1712; of fate, 1713; of galloping hoofs, 1847; of invective, 1849; of music, 1781; of prayers, 1842; of shot, 1849; of sighs, tears, or plaints, 1602; of snow, 1681; of sobs; of thoughts, 1569; of weeping, 1891; of whistlings, 1615; of words, 1693; of wrath.

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"Storm." Dictionary of Collective Nouns and Group Terms. . Encyclopedia.com. 22 Jun. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"Storm." Dictionary of Collective Nouns and Group Terms. . Encyclopedia.com. (June 22, 2017). http://www.encyclopedia.com/education/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/storm

"Storm." Dictionary of Collective Nouns and Group Terms. . Retrieved June 22, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/education/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/storm

storm

storm violent disturbance of the atmosphere, fig. of affairs OE.; paroxysm, violent access XVI; (from the vb.) assault of troops on a place XVII. OE. = OS. (Du.) storm, (O)HG. sturm, ON. stormr :- Gmc. *sturmaz, prob. f. *stur-, repr. also by STIR.
Hence storm vb. be tempestuous XV; (of persons) rage XVI; make an assault (on) XVII. stormy (-Y1) late OE.

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"storm." The Concise Oxford Dictionary of English Etymology. . Encyclopedia.com. 22 Jun. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"storm." The Concise Oxford Dictionary of English Etymology. . Encyclopedia.com. (June 22, 2017). http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/storm-1

"storm." The Concise Oxford Dictionary of English Etymology. . Retrieved June 22, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/storm-1

storm

storm Common term for gales, squalls, rainstorms, or thunderstorms. It is used specifically for conditions associated with the active areas of low-pressure systems. ‘Storm-force winds’ are, by definition, strong gales or winds, with speeds exceeding 20.8 m/s.

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"storm." A Dictionary of Earth Sciences. . Encyclopedia.com. 22 Jun. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"storm." A Dictionary of Earth Sciences. . Encyclopedia.com. (June 22, 2017). http://www.encyclopedia.com/science/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/storm

"storm." A Dictionary of Earth Sciences. . Retrieved June 22, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/science/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/storm

storm

stormconform, corm, dorm, form, forme, haulm, lukewarm, Maugham, misinform, norm, outperform, perform, shawm, storm, swarm, transform, underperform, warm •landform • platform • cubiform •fungiform, spongiform •aliform • bacilliform •cuneiform, uniform •variform • vitriform • cruciform •unciform • retiform • multiform •oviform • triform • microform •chloroform • cairngorm • sandstorm •barnstorm •brainstorm, rainstorm •windstorm • snowstorm • firestorm •thunderstorm

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"storm." Oxford Dictionary of Rhymes. . Encyclopedia.com. 22 Jun. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"storm." Oxford Dictionary of Rhymes. . Encyclopedia.com. (June 22, 2017). http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/storm

"storm." Oxford Dictionary of Rhymes. . Retrieved June 22, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/storm