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Abracadabra

Abracadabra

A magical word said to be formed from the letters of the abraxas, written thus:
A
AB
ABR
ABRA
ABRAC
ABRACA
ABRACAD
ABRACADA
ABRACADAB
ABRACADABR
ABRACADABRA
or the reverse way. The pronunciation of this word, according to Julius Africanus, was equally efficacious either way. According to Serenus Sammonicus, it was used as a spell to cure asthma. Abracalan, or aracalan, another form of the word, is said to have been regarded as the name of a god in Syria and as a magical symbol by the Jews. It seems doubtful whether the abracadabra, or its synonyms, was really the name of a deity.

Sources:

Lévi, Éliphas. Transcendental Magic. London: Rider, 1896. Reprint, New York: Samuel Weiser, 1970.

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abracadabra

ab·ra·ca·dab·ra / ˌabrəkəˈdabrə/ • interj. a word said by magicians when performing a magic trick. • n. inf. an implausibly easy effort to achieve a seemingly difficult feat: a little abracadabra, and you've got chocolate mousse. ∎  language, typically in the form of gibberish, used to give the impression of arcane knowledge or power.

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abracadabra

abracadabra (ăb´rəkədăb´rə), magical formula used by the Gnostics (see Gnosticism) to invoke the aid of benevolent spirits to ward off disease and affliction. It is supposed to be derived from the abraxas, a word that was engraved on gems and amulets or was variously worn as a protective charm. Handed down through the Middle Ages, the abracadabra gradually lost its occult significance, and its meaning was extended to cover any hocus-pocus.

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abracadabra

abracadabra a word said by conjurors when performing a magic trick. The term is recorded from the late 17th century, as a mystical word engraved and used as a charm against illness; it comes from Latin (from a Greek base), and is first recorded in a 2nd-century poem.

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abracadabra

abracadabrajarrah, para, Tara •abracadabra, Aldabra •Alhambra • Vanbrugh •Cassandra, Sandra •Aphra, Biafra •Niagara, pellagra, Viagra •bhangra, Ingres •Capra • Cleopatra •mantra, tantra, yantra •Basra •Asmara, Bukhara, carbonara, Carrara, cascara, Connemara, Damara, Ferrara, Gemara, Guadalajara, Guevara, Honiara, Lara, marinara, mascara, Nara, Sahara, Samara, samsara, samskara, shikara, Tamara, tiara, Varah, Zara •candelabra, macabre, sabra •Alexandra • Agra • fiacre •Chartres, Montmartre, Sartre, Sinatra, Sumatra •Shastra • Maharashtra • Le Havre •gurdwara •Berra, error, Ferrer, sierra, terror •zebra • ephedra • Porto Alegrebelles-lettres, Petra, raison d'être, tetra •Electra, plectra, spectra •Clytemnestra • extra •chèvre, Sèvres •Ezra

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ABRACADABRA

ABRACADABRA (ˌæbrəkəˈdæbrə) Abbreviations and Related Acronyms Associated with Defense, Astronautics, Business, and Radio-electronics (publication of Raytheon Company, Lexington, USA)

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