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Betty Crocker

BETTY CROCKER

BETTY CROCKER. Betty Crocker, an American cultural icon, was created in 1921 by the advertising department of the Washburn Crosby milling company just before it merged with General Mills. The consummate homemaker who could answer any cooking question with ease, Betty Crocker was based upon several real women, the two most notable being home economists Janette Kelley and Marjorie Child Husted.

Neither her name nor her face, which has been updated numerous times, was real. Both, however, became synonymous with good cooking and competent homemaking through newspaper columns, radio programs, television spots, and the publication of over 150 cookbooks. Betty Crocker's most significant contribution came in 1951 with the publication of Betty Crocker's Picture Cookbook, which remains a top-selling cookbook today. Unlike the extremely thorough The Joy of Cooking by Irma Rombauer, Betty Crocker's Picture Cookbook helped women cook by including both large illustrations and recipes on one page.

Betty Crocker's image and what it represents has created an automatic acceptance by consumers of numerous General Mills products from breads to cake mixes. Perhaps more important, her icon status has given her an active role in American life. Betty Crocker has helped generations of American women over the years deal with challenges including food scarcity during the Depression and World War II, a renewed emphasis on homemaking in the postwar years, and the increasing sophistication of American taste. From cutting food costs to increasing women's satisfaction through cooking to adding new ingredients to update old recipes, Betty Crocker continues to keep her finger on the pulse of American life and to respond accordingly.

See also Advertising of Food; Baking; Cake and Pancake; Cookbooks; Cooking; Marketing of Food .

BIBLIOGRAPHY

DuSablon, Mary Anna. America's Collectible Cookbooks: The History, the Politics, the Recipes. Athens: Ohio University Press, 1984.

Levenstein, Harvey. Paradox of Plenty: A Social History of Eating in Modern America. New York: Oxford University Press, 1993.

Erika A. Endrijonas

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"Betty Crocker." Encyclopedia of Food and Culture. . Encyclopedia.com. 24 Sep. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

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"Betty Crocker." Encyclopedia of Food and Culture. . Retrieved September 24, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/food/encyclopedias-almanacs-transcripts-and-maps/betty-crocker

Betty Crocker

Betty Crocker a fictitious character, exhibiting conservative values and a consistently cheerful demeanour, purporting to be the presenter or writer of a series of radio programmes, newspaper articles, and books on cooking, distributed in the United States from 1924 onwards. The name was first used in 1921 as the signatory to letters sent to prizewinners in a promotional competition.

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"Betty Crocker." The Oxford Dictionary of Phrase and Fable. . Encyclopedia.com. 24 Sep. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"Betty Crocker." The Oxford Dictionary of Phrase and Fable. . Encyclopedia.com. (September 24, 2017). http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/betty-crocker

"Betty Crocker." The Oxford Dictionary of Phrase and Fable. . Retrieved September 24, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/betty-crocker

Betty Crocker

Betty Crocker Fictitious name developed by Washburn, Crosby Co. of Minneapolis in 1921 as a signature for letters in response to a picture puzzle competition, and adopted as a signature for responses to enquiries by General Mills in 1936, and later as a brand name for their home baking products.

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"Betty Crocker." A Dictionary of Food and Nutrition. . Encyclopedia.com. 24 Sep. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

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"Betty Crocker." A Dictionary of Food and Nutrition. . Retrieved September 24, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/education/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/betty-crocker