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transducer

transducer, device that accepts an input of energy in one form and produces an output of energy in some other form, with a known, fixed relationship between the input and output. One widely used class of transducers consists of devices that produce an electric output signal, e.g., microphones and photoelectric cells. Other widely used transducers accept an electric input, e.g., loudspeakers, light bulbs, and solenoids. The term transducer is sometimes applied to devices producing an output in the same form as their input, e.g., transformers and filters.

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"transducer." The Columbia Encyclopedia, 6th ed.. . Encyclopedia.com. 17 Aug. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

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"transducer." The Columbia Encyclopedia, 6th ed.. . Retrieved August 17, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/reference/encyclopedias-almanacs-transcripts-and-maps/transducer

transducer

transducer
1. (sensor) Any device that converts energy in the form of sound, light, pressure, etc., into an equivalent electrical signal, or vice versa. For example, a semiconductor laser converts electrical energy into light, and a piezoelectric device converts mechanical stress into electrical energy (and vice versa).

2. In formal language theory, any automaton that produces output.

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"transducer." A Dictionary of Computing. . Encyclopedia.com. 17 Aug. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"transducer." A Dictionary of Computing. . Encyclopedia.com. (August 17, 2017). http://www.encyclopedia.com/computing/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/transducer

"transducer." A Dictionary of Computing. . Retrieved August 17, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/computing/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/transducer

transducer

trans·duc·er / transˈd(y)oōsər; tranz-/ • n. a device that converts variations in a physical quantity, such as pressure or brightness, into an electrical signal, or vice versa. DERIVATIVES: trans·duce v. trans·duc·tion / -ˈdəkshən/ n.

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"transducer." The Oxford Pocket Dictionary of Current English. . Encyclopedia.com. 17 Aug. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"transducer." The Oxford Pocket Dictionary of Current English. . Encyclopedia.com. (August 17, 2017). http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/transducer

"transducer." The Oxford Pocket Dictionary of Current English. . Retrieved August 17, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/transducer

transducer

transducer (trans-dew-ser) n. a device used to convert one form of signal into another, allowing its measurement or display to be made appropriately. For example, an ultrasound probe converts reflected ultrasound waves into electronic impulses, which can be displayed on a TV monitor.

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"transducer." A Dictionary of Nursing. . Encyclopedia.com. 17 Aug. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"transducer." A Dictionary of Nursing. . Encyclopedia.com. (August 17, 2017). http://www.encyclopedia.com/caregiving/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/transducer

"transducer." A Dictionary of Nursing. . Retrieved August 17, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/caregiving/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/transducer

transducer

transducer Device for converting any nonelectrical signal, such as sound or light, into an electrical signal, and vice versa. Examples include microphones, loudspeakers, and various measuring instruments used in acoustics.

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"transducer." World Encyclopedia. . Encyclopedia.com. 17 Aug. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"transducer." World Encyclopedia. . Encyclopedia.com. (August 17, 2017). http://www.encyclopedia.com/environment/encyclopedias-almanacs-transcripts-and-maps/transducer

"transducer." World Encyclopedia. . Retrieved August 17, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/environment/encyclopedias-almanacs-transcripts-and-maps/transducer