Skip to main content

Price, Sterling

Sterling Price, 1809–67, Confederate general in the American Civil War, b. Prince Edward co., Va. After moving to Missouri, he practiced law and entered politics. He served in Congress (1844–46), resigning to lead a Missouri regiment in the Mexican War. Made military governor of New Mexico, he put down a rising of Native Americans and Mexicans. Price was governor of Missouri (1853–57) and president of the state convention of Mar., 1861, which opposed secession. However, his displeasure at the activities of the extreme Unionists led him to accept the command of the Missouri secessionist militia in May, 1861. At Wilson's Creek (Aug., 1861) he and Ben McCulloch defeated the Union forces. Price then took Lexington but was soon obliged to retreat into Arkansas. After the Union victory at Pea Ridge (Mar., 1862), Price accepted a regular Confederate commission. His campaign around Iuka and Corinth, Miss. (Oct., 1862), was unsuccessful. He opposed Gen. Frederick Steele in Arkansas (1863–64). Price's raid through Missouri (Sept.–Oct., 1864), after initial successes, was finally turned back at Westport and was the last Confederate threat in the Far West.

See studies by A. E. Castel (1968) and R. E. Shalhoyse (1971).

Cite this article
Pick a style below, and copy the text for your bibliography.

  • MLA
  • Chicago
  • APA

"Price, Sterling." The Columbia Encyclopedia, 6th ed.. . Encyclopedia.com. 22 Aug. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"Price, Sterling." The Columbia Encyclopedia, 6th ed.. . Encyclopedia.com. (August 22, 2017). http://www.encyclopedia.com/reference/encyclopedias-almanacs-transcripts-and-maps/price-sterling

"Price, Sterling." The Columbia Encyclopedia, 6th ed.. . Retrieved August 22, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/reference/encyclopedias-almanacs-transcripts-and-maps/price-sterling

Learn more about citation styles

Citation styles

Encyclopedia.com gives you the ability to cite reference entries and articles according to common styles from the Modern Language Association (MLA), The Chicago Manual of Style, and the American Psychological Association (APA).

Within the “Cite this article” tool, pick a style to see how all available information looks when formatted according to that style. Then, copy and paste the text into your bibliography or works cited list.

Because each style has its own formatting nuances that evolve over time and not all information is available for every reference entry or article, Encyclopedia.com cannot guarantee each citation it generates. Therefore, it’s best to use Encyclopedia.com citations as a starting point before checking the style against your school or publication’s requirements and the most-recent information available at these sites:

Modern Language Association

http://www.mla.org/style

The Chicago Manual of Style

http://www.chicagomanualofstyle.org/tools_citationguide.html

American Psychological Association

http://apastyle.apa.org/

Notes:
  • Most online reference entries and articles do not have page numbers. Therefore, that information is unavailable for most Encyclopedia.com content. However, the date of retrieval is often important. Refer to each style’s convention regarding the best way to format page numbers and retrieval dates.
  • In addition to the MLA, Chicago, and APA styles, your school, university, publication, or institution may have its own requirements for citations. Therefore, be sure to refer to those guidelines when editing your bibliography or works cited list.