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nest

nest, structure for the reception and incubation of the eggs of birds, reptiles, insects, and some fish or for the parturition of mammals, and also for the care of the young during their period of helplessness. Chimpanzees, orangutan, and gorillas build nests to sleep in each night. Birds are the chief nest builders, exhibiting great variety and ingenuity among the different species. The type of nest depends on the environment and the condition of the young when hatched. Altricial birds, whose young are generally blind, naked, and helpless on hatching, usually build higher and more elaborate nests than do precocial birds, whose young have a downy covering and are able to move about and feed themselves soon after emerging from the egg. Most sea birds, shore birds, and game birds do not build real nests but lay their eggs directly on a rocky ledge or in a shallow depression scooped out of the earth or sand. Woodpeckers and parrots nest inside hollow trees, as do the Old World hornbills; the male hornbill seals the female into the cavity, leaving an aperture only large enough for him to feed her as she incubates the eggs. Sand martins and kingfishers dig tunnels into shore banks, with enlarged nesting chambers at the ends. The stork's nest is a simple platform of sticks, and the eagle's aerie, built in tree tops or on cliffs, may be 5 to 12 ft (1.5–3.7 m) in diameter; both birds add to their nests each year. As a general rule, the smaller the bird the more elaborate is the nest. Among passerine (perching) birds the male usually selects the feeding and nesting territory, while the female chooses the nest site. In many species the duties of nest building and incubating are shared. The nest is usually bowl-shaped and composed of twigs, grass, leaves, and (when available) bits of cloth and string; thrushes line their nests with clay. Intricately woven, pendent, arboreal nests give the American oriole its alternate name, hangnest; the Old World weaverbirds' nests are similar, with one species building immense communal structures housing up to 600 birds. Swallows, ovenbirds, and flamingos build nests of mud cemented with saliva, and an Oriental swift builds its nest entirely of a salivary secretion (used to make bird's-nest soup by the Chinese). The turkeylike megapode, or mound bird, of Australia leaves its eggs in a pile of decaying vegetation, which provides the heat to incubate them; it is the only bird to share this nesting method with the reptiles. Among the insects, ants, bees, and wasps are well known for their nests. Some fish (e.g., the stickleback) build nests of weeds. Most rodents (e.g., mice and squirrels) are nesters; rabbits line their nests with down, as do ducks and geese. The den or lair of the larger mammals (e.g., wolves and lions) serves the same function as a nest.

See P. Goodfellow, Avian Architecture (2011).

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"nest." The Columbia Encyclopedia, 6th ed.. . Encyclopedia.com. 22 Aug. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"nest." The Columbia Encyclopedia, 6th ed.. . Encyclopedia.com. (August 22, 2017). http://www.encyclopedia.com/reference/encyclopedias-almanacs-transcripts-and-maps/nest

"nest." The Columbia Encyclopedia, 6th ed.. . Retrieved August 22, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/reference/encyclopedias-almanacs-transcripts-and-maps/nest

nest

nest / nest/ • n. 1. a structure or place made or chosen by a bird for laying eggs and sheltering its young. ∎  a place where an animal or insect breeds or shelters: an ants' nest. ∎  a person's snug or secluded retreat or shelter. ∎  a bowl-shaped object likened to a bird's nest: arrange in nests of lettuce leaves. ∎  a place filled with or frequented by undesirable people or things: a nest of spies. 2. a set of similar objects of graduated sizes, made so that each smaller one fits into the next in size for storage: a nest of tables. • v. 1. [intr.] (of a bird or other animal) use or build a nest: the owls often nest in barns | [as adj.] (nesting) do not disturb nesting birds. 2. [tr.] (often be nested) fit (an object or objects) inside a larger one: the town is nested inside a large crater on the flanks of a volcano. ∎  [intr.] (of a set of objects) fit inside one another: Russian dolls that nest inside one another. ∎  (esp. in computing and linguistics) place (an object or element) in a hierarchical arrangement, typically in a subordinate position: [as adj.] (nested) organisms classified in a series of nested sets | a nested relative clause. DERIVATIVES: nest·ful / -ˌfoŏl/ n. (pl. -fuls) . nest·like / -ˌlīk/ adj.

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"nest." The Oxford Pocket Dictionary of Current English. . Encyclopedia.com. 22 Aug. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"nest." The Oxford Pocket Dictionary of Current English. . Encyclopedia.com. (August 22, 2017). http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/nest-1

"nest." The Oxford Pocket Dictionary of Current English. . Retrieved August 22, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/nest-1

Nest

Nest

a number or collection of people; a number of birds or insects gathered in the same place; an accumulation of similar objects; a number of buildings or streets; a set of objects. See also aerie, bike, brood, swarm.

Examples: nest of alleys, 1875; of ants, 1818; of arguments, 1874; of boxes (which fit inside each other), 1658; of low bushes, 1845; of caterpillars, 1760; of chicken, 1562; of coffins (set inside each other, e.g., as in as Egyptian burial), 1834; of crocodiles; of dormice, 1774; of drawers, 1704; of eagles, 1484; of evils, 1666; of fish, 1835; of flowerpots, 1849; of fools, 1721; of foxes, 1470; of goblets, 1524; of hedgehogs; of hornets, 1727; of hummocks, 1756; of kittens, 1881; of mice; of miracles, 1642; of nightcaps, 1689; of outlaws, 1861; of partridge, 1593; of pirates; of profaneness; of quiet streets, 1861; of rabbits, 1470; of robbers; of rumours; of salmon, 1899; of scorpions, 1593; of seraphim, 1652; of shelves, 1785; of tables; of toads, 1589; of traitors; of trotters; of tyranny, 1586; of vipers; of wasps, 1486; of wharfs and warehouses, 1796.

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"Nest." Dictionary of Collective Nouns and Group Terms. . Encyclopedia.com. 22 Aug. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

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nest

nest Structure built by a living organism to house itself, its eggs, or its young. Nest-builders include some invertebrates, particularly social insects, and members of all the larger groups of vertebrates. The nests of ants, bees, wasps, and termites may be highly elaborate and involve tunnels, passages and chambers. The nests of fish may be simple gravel scoops or enclosed structures, sometimes made of bubbles. Birds' nests vary enormously from simple, cup-shaped arrangements of twigs and other organic materials, to woven or knotted grass or leaves; some birds scrape a hollow in the ground to make a nest, others make nest-holes in cliffs, earth banks or trees. The most highly evolved animal to make a form of a nest is probably the gorilla, which builds a new sleeping platform of branches every night.

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"nest." World Encyclopedia. . Encyclopedia.com. 22 Aug. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"nest." World Encyclopedia. . Encyclopedia.com. (August 22, 2017). http://www.encyclopedia.com/environment/encyclopedias-almanacs-transcripts-and-maps/nest

"nest." World Encyclopedia. . Retrieved August 22, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/environment/encyclopedias-almanacs-transcripts-and-maps/nest

nest

nest nest egg a sum of money saved for the future; originally, a real or artificial egg left in a nest to induce hens to lay eggs there.

See also birds in their little nests agree, there are no birds in last year's nest, cuckoo in the nest, feather one's own nest, fly the nest, it is an ill bird that fouls its own nest, mare's nest.

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"nest." The Oxford Dictionary of Phrase and Fable. . Encyclopedia.com. 22 Aug. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

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"nest." The Oxford Dictionary of Phrase and Fable. . Retrieved August 22, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/nest

nest

nest bird's laying- and hatching-place OE.; set of similar objects XVI. OE. nest = (M)Du., (O)HG. nest :- IE. *nizdo-, whence also L. nīdus, OIr. net (mod. nead), W. nyth nest, Skr. nīḍá- resting-place; f. *ni down (cf. NETHER) + *sed- SIT.
Hence vb. XIII; repl. OE. nistan = MDu., (O)HG. nisten.

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"nest." The Concise Oxford Dictionary of English Etymology. . Encyclopedia.com. 22 Aug. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

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nest

nestabreast, arrest, attest, beau geste, behest, bequest, best, blessed, blest, breast, Brest, Bucharest, Budapest, celeste, chest, contest, crest, digest, divest, guest, hest, infest, ingest, jest, lest, Midwest, molest, nest, northwest, pest, prestressed, protest, quest, rest, self-addressed, self-confessed, self-possessed, southwest, suggest, test, Trieste, unaddressed, unexpressed, unimpressed, unpressed, unstressed, vest, west, wrest, zest •manifest • talkfest • Hammerfest •Almagest • backrest • armrest •redbreast • headrest • imprest •chimney breast • footrest • firecrest •incest • palimpsest • unprocessed •road test • undervest • conquest

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"nest." Oxford Dictionary of Rhymes. . Encyclopedia.com. 22 Aug. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

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"nest." Oxford Dictionary of Rhymes. . Retrieved August 22, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/nest-0