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lime (in botany)

lime, in botany, small shrublike tree (Citrus aurantifolia) of the family Rutaceae (rue family), one of the citrus fruit trees, similar to the lemon but more spreading and irregular in growth. The true lime, a natural hybrid of the citron and papeda, is native to SE Asia and has been introduced into S Europe, the West Indies, Mexico, Florida, and California. Chief production is in tropical regions of the Old and New World; most true limes in American commerce, often known as Key or Mexican limes, come from Mexico or the West Indies. The lime is the most susceptible to frost injury of all citrus fruits, but some varieties do well in sandy or rocky soils usually unfavorable to citrus.

The bright green fruit is smaller than the lemon, more globular, more acid, and with a thinner rind. It has the vitamin value and other properties of the citrus fruits. The juice has long been known as a preventive against scurvy and is one of the main sources of citric acid.

The predominant lime in American cuisine is a larger, more mildly flavored, typically seedless cross, C. latifolia, between the true lime and citron, known as a Persian, Tahitian, or Bearss lime, and there are a number of other citrus fruits called limes. The name lime is also applied to the unrelated linden and sometimes to a species of tupelo, or sour gum, known also as the Ogeechee lime.

Limes are classified in the division Magnoliophyta, class Magnoliopsida, order Sapindales, family Rutaceae.

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lime

lime The fruit of Citrus aurantifolia, cultivated almost solely in the tropics, since it is less hardy than other citrus fruits. Used to prevent scurvy in the British Navy (replacing, at the time, lemon juice) and so giving rise to the nickname of ‘Limeys’ for British sailors and for British people in general. Contains about 10–20 mg vitamin C per 100 g fruit or fresh juice.

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"lime." A Dictionary of Food and Nutrition. . Encyclopedia.com. 11 Dec. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

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lime

lime Any of the deciduous linden trees that grow throughout Earth's n temperate zone. The lime tree has serrated, heart-shaped leaves with small, fragrant, yellowish flowers borne in clusters. The common British linden, Tilia vulgaris, is one of three British species. The American lime, T. americana, is also called basswood. Family Tiliaceae.

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lime

lime Small tropical tree (Citrus aurantifolia) of the rue family (Rutaceae). The trees grow to 2.4–4.6m (8–15ft) tall and yield small green acid fruits. The juice was a valuable commodity in the 18th and 19th centuries for consumption on long sea voyages; the vitamin C helped to ward off scurvy.

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lime

lime
1. The fruit of Citrus aurantifolia.

2. (linden) The common name for trees of the genus Tilia.

3. Compounds mostly of calcium carbonates, but also other basic (alkaline) substances, used to correct soil acidity and occasionally as fertilizers to supply magnesium.

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"lime." A Dictionary of Ecology. . Encyclopedia.com. 11 Dec. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

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lime

lime
1. See CITRUS

2. (linden) See TILIA.

3. Compounds mostly of calcium carbonates, but also other basic (alkaline) substances, used to correct soil acidity and occasionally as a fertilizer to supply magnesium.

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"lime." A Dictionary of Plant Sciences. . Encyclopedia.com. 11 Dec. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

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lime

lime2 kind of citrus fruit. XVII. — F. — modPr. limo, Sp. lima — Arab. līma, coll. līm fruits of the citron kind.

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"lime." The Concise Oxford Dictionary of English Etymology. . Encyclopedia.com. 11 Dec. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

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lime

lime3 linden. XVII. unexpl. alt. of line, var. of lind (see LINDEN).

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lime

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"lime." Oxford Dictionary of Rhymes. . Encyclopedia.com. 11 Dec. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

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