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well1 / wel/ • adv. (bet·ter , best ) 1. in a good or satisfactory way: the whole team played well. ∎  in a way that is appropriate to the facts or circumstances: you did well to come and tell me | [in comb.] a well-timed exit. ∎  so as to have a fortunate outcome: his campaign did not go well. ∎  in a kind way: the animals will remain loyal to humans if treated well. ∎  with praise or approval: people spoke well of him the film was quite well reviewed at the time. ∎  with equanimity: she took it very well, all things considered. ∎  profitably; advantageously: she would marry well or not at all. ∎  in a condition of prosperity or comfort: they lived well and were generous with their money. ∎ archaic luckily; opportunely: hail fellow, well met. 2. in a thorough manner: add the mustard and lemon juice and mix well. ∎  to a great extent or degree (often used for emphasis): the visit had been planned well in advance | [in comb.] a well-loved mother. ∎  intimately; closely: he knew my father very well. ∎  Brit., inf. very; extremely: he was well out of order. ∎  used as an intensifier: I should bloody well hope so. 3. very probably; in all likelihood: being short of breath may well be the first sign of asthma. ∎  without difficulty: she could well afford to pay for the reception herself. ∎  with good reason: “What are we doing here?” “You may well ask.” • adj. (bet·ter, best) 1. in good health; free or recovered from illness: I don't feel very well it would be some time before Sarah was completely well | inf. he was not a well man. ∎  in a satisfactory state or position: all is not well in post-Soviet Russia. 2. sensible; advisable: it would be well to know just what this suggestion entails. • interj. used to express a range of emotions including surprise, anger, resignation, or relief: Well, really! The manners of some people! ∎  used when pausing to consider one's next words: well, I suppose I could fit you in at 3:45. ∎  used to express agreement or acceptance, often in a qualified or slightly reluctant way: well, all right, but be quick. ∎  used to introduce the resumption of a narrative or a change of subject. ∎  used to mark the end of a conversation or activity: well, cheers, Tom—I must run. ∎  used to indicate that one is waiting for an answer or explanation from someone: Well? You promised to tell me all about it. PHRASES: all's well that ends wellsee all.all very wellsee all.as well 1. in addition; too: the museum provides hours of fun and a few surprises as well a shop that sold books as well as newspapers. 2. (as well or just as well) with equal reason or an equally good result: I may as well have a look. ∎  sensible, appropriate, or desirable: it would be as well to let him go. as well he (or she, etc.) might (or may) used to convey the speaker's opinion that a reaction is appropriate or unsurprising: she sounded rather chipper, as well she might, given her bright prospects.be well out of Brit., inf. be fortunate to be no longer involved in (a situation).be well in with inf. have a good relationship with (someone in a position of influence or authority): you're well in with O'Brien, aren't you?be well up on (or in) know a great deal about (a particular thing).do well for oneself be successful, typically in material or financial terms.leave (or let) well enough alone refrain from interfering with or trying to improve something that is satisfactory or adequate as it is.very well used to express agreement or understanding, sometimes grudging: oh very well then, come in. (all) well and good used to express acceptance of a first statement before introducing a contradictory or confirming second statement: well, that's all well and good, but why didn't he phone her to say so?well and truly completely: Leith was well and truly rattled.well enough to a reasonable degree: he liked Isobel well enough, but wouldn't want to make a close friend of her.well worth certainly worth: Salzburg is well worth a visit. ORIGIN: Old English wel(l), of Germanic origin; related to Dutch wel and German wohl; probably also to the verb will1 . well2 • n. 1. a shaft sunk into the ground to obtain water, oil, or gas. ∎  a plentiful source or supply: she could feel a deep well of sympathy and compassion. ∎ archaic a water spring or fountain. ∎ short for inkwell. ∎  a depression made to hold liquid: put the flour on a flat surface and make a well to hold the eggs. ∎  (Wells) [in place names] chiefly Brit. a place where there are mineral springs: Tunbridge Wells. 2. an enclosed space in the middle of a building, giving room for stairs or an elevator, or to allow light or ventilation. ∎  Brit. the place in a court of law where the clerks and ushers sit. 3. Physics a region of minimum potential: a gravity well. • v. [intr.] (of a liquid) rise to the surface and spill or be about to spill: tears were beginning to well in her eyes. ∎  (of an emotion) arise and become more intense: all the old bitterness began to well up inside her again.

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"well." The Oxford Pocket Dictionary of Current English. . Encyclopedia.com. 20 Aug. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"well." The Oxford Pocket Dictionary of Current English. . Encyclopedia.com. (August 20, 2017). http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/well-4

"well." The Oxford Pocket Dictionary of Current English. . Retrieved August 20, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/well-4

well

well2 all's well that ends well proverbial saying, late 14th century, often used with the implication that difficulties have been successfully negotiated. (A related saying of the mid 13th century runs, ‘Wel is him that wel ende mai.’)
well begun is half done proverbial saying, early 15th century; emphasizing the importance of a successful beginning to the completion of a project. Related comments are found in classical Greek and Latin: Plato in his Laws has the comment, ‘proverbially it is said that the beginning is the half of every task’, and Horace in Epistles comments, ‘he who has made a beginning, has half done.’

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"well." The Oxford Dictionary of Phrase and Fable. . Encyclopedia.com. 20 Aug. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"well." The Oxford Dictionary of Phrase and Fable. . Encyclopedia.com. (August 20, 2017). http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/well-0

"well." The Oxford Dictionary of Phrase and Fable. . Retrieved August 20, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/well-0

Wells

Wells, town (1991 pop. 9,252), Somerset, SW England. Primarily a cathedral town, it has changed little since medieval times, although shopping and tourism have become important. The first church was erected by King Ine of Wessex in the early 8th cent. The earliest part of the present cathedral dates from 1176. The towers were built in the 14th cent., much of the woodwork dates from the 15th cent., and there are more than 300 13th-century sculptured figures. The grounds of the bishop's palace include ruins of the original 13th-century structure and the complete 14th-century moat and wall. A theological college is in Wells.

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"Wells." The Columbia Encyclopedia, 6th ed.. . Encyclopedia.com. 20 Aug. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

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well

well3 in a good manner, to a good extent, fully. OE. wel(l) = OS. (Du.) wel, ON. vel; also with adv. suffix (and vowel-variation) OS. wela, wala, wola, OHG. wela, wola (G. wohl), Goth. waila; prob. f. IE. wel- wol- WILL2. As adj. †happy, fortunate XIII; prosperous (now only in well to do, well off) XIV; in sound health XVI; orig. developed from the adv. in impers. uses, e.g. wel is pe. Comp. well-wisher XVI.

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"well." The Concise Oxford Dictionary of English Etymology. . Encyclopedia.com. 20 Aug. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

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well

well1 a well is the emblem of St Juthwara and St Sidwell, sisters, and reputed British virgin martyrs with a cult in the south west of England. Wells, representing springs of natural water, are often associated with holy sites, as that of the shrine of St Winefride in Wales.
well-dressing the decoration of wells with flowers, an ancient custom at Whitsuntide especially in Derbyshire.

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"well." The Oxford Dictionary of Phrase and Fable. . Retrieved August 20, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/well

well

well1 spring of water, pit dug to obtain a supply of spring water OE.; various transf. senses from XVII. OE. (Angl.) wella, wælla, *well(e), (WS.) *wiella, late will(a), wyll(a), wylle, corr. to OHG. wella (G. welle) wave, ON. vella boiling heat, ebullition, f. Gmc. *wall-; see WELL2.

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Well

Well

a source of supply.

Examples: well of all courage, 1377; of all crafts, 1377; of gentleness, 1440; of grace, c. 1300; of mercy; of mischief, 1538; of pity, 1530; of tears, 1382; of serious thought; of wisdom, 1225.

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"Well." Dictionary of Collective Nouns and Group Terms. . Encyclopedia.com. 20 Aug. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

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well

well2 †boil, melt OE.; rise up to the eyes XIV; (dial.) weld XV. OE. str. vb. weallan = OS. wallan, OHG. wallan (G. wallen boil, swarm):- WGmc. *wallan; cf. prec.

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well

we'll / wēl/ • contr. of we shall; we will.

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"well." The Oxford Pocket Dictionary of Current English. . Encyclopedia.com. 20 Aug. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

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"well." The Oxford Pocket Dictionary of Current English. . Retrieved August 20, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/well-5

well

wellAdele, Aix-la-Chapelle, aquarelle, artel, au naturel, bagatelle, béchamel, befell, bell, belle, boatel, Brunel, Cadell, carousel, cartel, cell, Chanel, chanterelle, clientele, Clonmel, compel, Cornell, crime passionnel, dell, demoiselle, dispel, dwell, el, ell, Estelle, excel, expel, farewell, fell, Fidel, fontanelle, foretell, Gabrielle, gazelle, gel, Giselle, hell, hotel, impel, knell, lapel, mademoiselle, maître d'hôtel, Manuel, marcel, matériel, mesdemoiselles, Michel, Michelle, Miguel, misspell, morel, moschatel, Moselle, motel, muscatel, nacelle, Nell, Nobel, Noel, organelle, outsell, Parnell, pell-mell, personnel, propel, quell, quenelle, rappel, Raquel, Ravel, rebel, repel, Rochelle, Sahel, sardelle, sell, shell, show-and-tell, smell, Snell, spell, spinel, swell, tell, undersell, vielle, villanelle, well, yell •Buñuel • Pachelbel • handbell •barbell • harebell • decibel • doorbell •cowbell • bluebell • Annabel •mirabelle • Christabel • Jezebel •Isabel, Isobel •nutshell • infidel • asphodel •zinfandel • Grenfell • Hillel • parallel •Cozumel • caramel • Fresnel •pimpernel • pipistrelle • Tricel •filoselle

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Wells

Wells •Casals • Charles •Dardanelles, Seychelles, Wells •Hales, Swales, Wales •entrails • telesales • cat-o'-nine-tails •Hills, Mills, Sills, Wills •Giles, Miles, Smiles, Stiles •hols • consols •balls, Rawls, Walls •Fowles •Bowles, Coles, Rolls •gules, Jules •collywobbles • Gorbals • Mumbles •Goebbels • Needles • oodles • Raffles •Engels • Gleneagles • Eccles • Pickles •Naples • Brussels • battels • Beatles •bristols • measles

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