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Erastianism

Erastianism Complete control of Church affairs by the State. It is named after Thomas Erastus (1524–85), a Swiss physician and theologian, who denied that the Church alone had disciplinary powers, especially of excommunication. Hence, Erastianism is a distortion of his position, which assumed cooperation between Church and State.

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"Erastianism." World Encyclopedia. . Encyclopedia.com. 16 Dec. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"Erastianism." World Encyclopedia. . Encyclopedia.com. (December 16, 2017). http://www.encyclopedia.com/environment/encyclopedias-almanacs-transcripts-and-maps/erastianism

"Erastianism." World Encyclopedia. . Retrieved December 16, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/environment/encyclopedias-almanacs-transcripts-and-maps/erastianism

Erastianism

Erastianism. The view that the state has the right and responsibility to intervene in and control the affairs of the Christian Church as it appears in a particular State. The view was proposed by Thomas Erastus (Germ. Liebler, Lieber, or Lübler), 1524–83, against the Calvinists.

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"Erastianism." The Concise Oxford Dictionary of World Religions. . Encyclopedia.com. 16 Dec. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"Erastianism." The Concise Oxford Dictionary of World Religions. . Encyclopedia.com. (December 16, 2017). http://www.encyclopedia.com/religion/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/erastianism

"Erastianism." The Concise Oxford Dictionary of World Religions. . Retrieved December 16, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/religion/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/erastianism