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Kelley, David E. 1956–

KELLEY, David E. 1956–

PERSONAL

Full name, David Edward Kelley; born April 4, 1956, in Waterville, ME; son of Jack (a civic center operations director and hockey coach) and Ginny Kelley; married Michelle Pfeiffer (an actress), November 13, 1993; children: Claudia Rose, John Henry. Education: Princeton University, B.A., 1979; Boston University, J.D., 1983. Avocational Interests: Cribbage.

Addresses:

Office—David E. Kelley Productions, 1600 Rosecrans Ave., Building 4B, Manhattan Beach, CA 90266. Agent—William Morris Agency, 151 El Camino Dr., Beverly Hills, CA 90212. Manager—Marty Adelstein, Adelstein–Parouse Productions, 9606 Santa Monica Blvd., Beverly Hills, CA 90210.

Career:

Producer, writer, and story editor. David E. Kelley Productions, Manhattan Beach, CA, principal, c. 1992—; executive and creative consultant for television. Professional hockey player in Switzerland, c. 1979–80; Fine & Ambrogne, Boston, MA, lawyer, 1983–86.

Awards, Honors:

George Foster Peabody Broadcasting Award, Henry W. Grady School of Journalism and Mass Communications, University of Georgia, 1987, for Doogie Howser, M.D.; Emmy Award nomination (with others), outstanding drama series, 1988, and Emmy awards (with others), outstanding drama series, 1989, 1990, and 1991, all for L.A. Law; Emmy Award nominations (with others), outstanding writing in a drama series, 1988, for "Beauty and Obese" and "Full Marital Jacket," 1989, for "I'm in the Nude for Love" and "His Suit Is Hirsute," 1990, for "Bang … Zoom … Zap," and 1991, for "Mutinies on the Banzai," and Emmy awards (with others), outstanding writing in a drama series, 1990, for "Blood, Sweat, & Fears," and 1991, for "On the Toad Again," all episodes of L.A. Law; Emmy Award nomination, outstanding writing in a drama series, 1989, and Edgar Allan Poe Award nomination (with others), Mystery Writers of America, best television episode, 1990, both for "Urine Trouble Now," L.A. Law; Edgar Allan Poe Award nomination (with others) and Writers Guild of America Award nomination (with others), both outstanding episodic drama, 1991, for "Justice Swerved," L.A. Law; Alumni Award, Boston University, 1992; Emmy awards (with others), outstanding drama series, 1993 and 1994, and Humanitas Prize (with others), Human Family Educational and Cultural Institute, sixty–minute category, 1996, all for Picket Fences; Edgar Allan Poe Award nomination, best television episode, 1994, for "Turpitude," Picket Fences; Emmy Award nominations (with others), outstanding drama series, 1995 and 1996, and E Pluribus Unum Award, Cinema Foundation, best television series, all for Chicago Hope; Writers Guild of America Award nomination (with others), outstanding episodic drama, 1996, for "Saint Zack," Picket Fences; Paul Selvin Honorary Award, Writers Guild of America, 1996; Golden Globe awards, best musical or comedy television series, 1997 and 1998, George Foster Peabody Broadcasting Award, 1998, Emmy Award nomination (with others), outstanding comedy series, 1998, Emmy Award (with others), outstanding comedy series, 1999, Television Award nomination, British Academy of Film and Television Arts, best international program or series, 1999, Television Critics Association Award, outstanding individual achievement in drama, 1999, TV Guide Award nominations, favorite comedy series, 2000, and comedy series of the year, 2001, and Golden Globe Award nomination, best musical or comedy television series, 2002, all for Ally McBeal; International Monitor Award (with others), best achievement in film originated television series, 1998, for "Cro–Magnon," Ally McBeal; Emmy Award nominations, outstanding writing for a comedy series, 1998, for "Theme of Life," and 1999, for "Sideshow," both Ally McBeal; honored by Legal Aid Foundation of Los Angeles and by Broadcasting and Cable Hall of Fame, Museum of Television and Radio, 1998; Emmy Award nomination, outstanding writing for a drama series, 1998, and Writers Guild of America Award nomination, best episodic drama, 1999, both for "Betrayal," The Practice; George Foster Peabody Broadcasting Award, 1998, Golden Globe Award, best dramatic television series, 1998, Emmy awards (with others), outstanding drama series, 1998 and 1999, Norman Felton Producer of the Year Award in Episodic Television (with others), Golden Laurel awards, Producers Guild of America, 1999, TV Guide Award nomination, favorite drama series, 2000, and Emmy Award nominations (with others), outstanding drama series, 2000 and 2001, all for The Practice; Edgar Allan Poe Award nominations (with others), best television episode, 1998, for "First Degree," and 2002, for "Killing Time," both The Practice; Astral Award of Excellence, Banff Television Festival, 1999; Showman of the Year Award, Monte Carlo Television Festival, 2000; Media Award, Prevention for a Safer Society, television and video category, 2000; David Susskind Lifetime Achievement Award in Television, Golden Laurel awards, 2001; Brandon Tartikoff Award, TV Guide awards, 2001; honored by Tourette Syndrome Association, 2001; Career Achievement Award, Casting Society of America, 2002; Humanitas Prize (with others), sixty–minute category, 2002, for "Honor Code," and 2003, for "Final Judgment," both The Practice; Paddy Chayefsky Laurel Award for Television Writing Achievement, Writers Guild of America, 2003; George Foster Peabody Broadcasting Award, 2003, for Boston Public; Edgar Allan Poe Award (with others), best television episode, 2004, for "Goodbye," The Practice; Television Showmanship Award, Publicists Guild of America.

CREDITS

Television Work; Series:

Story editor and coproducer, L.A. Law, NBC, 1987–88.

Executive story editor, L.A. Law, NBC, 1988.

Supervising producer, L.A. Law, NBC, 1988–90.

Creator (with Steven Bochco) and supervising producer, Doogie Howser, M.D., ABC, 1989–93.

Executive producer, L.A. Law, NBC, 1990–91.

Creator and executive producer, Picket Fences, CBS, 1992–96.

Creator and executive producer, Chicago Hope, CBS, 1994–95.

Creator and executive producer, Ally McBeal, Fox, 1997–2002.

Creator and executive producer, The Practice, ABC, 1997–2004.

Creator and executive producer, Ally, Fox, 1999.

Creator and executive producer, Snoops, ABC, 1999.

Creator and executive producer, Boston Public, Fox, 2000–2002.

Creator and executive producer, Girls Club (also known as girls club), Fox, 2002.

Creator, The Brotherhood of Poland, New Hampshire (also known as The Brotherhood of Poland, N.H.), CBS, 2003.

Creator and executive producer, Boston Legal, ABC, 2004.

Creator and executive producer, The Law Firm, NBC, beginning 2005.

Executive producer, Halley's Comet, The WB, beginning 2005.

Television Executive Producer; Pilots:

(And creator) Picket Fences, CBS, 1992.

(And creator) Chicago Hope, CBS, 1994.

Mixed Nuts, NBC, 1996.

(And creator) The Practice, ABC, 1997.

DeMarco Affairs, ABC, 2004.

Five Finger Discount, NBC, 2004.

Television Appearances; Miniseries:

Himself, TV Land Moguls, TV Land, 2004.

Television Appearances; Specials:

The L.A. Law 100th Episode Special, NBC, 1991.

Today at Night, NBC, 1994.

Television Appearances; Awards Presentations:

Thirteenth Annual Genesis Awards, Animal Planet, 1999.

The 2001 TV Guide Awards, Fox, 2001.

Television Appearances; Episodic:

(Uncredited) "Swan Chant," Snoops, ABC, 2000.

Himself, "Ray Walston: No Antennae, Please," Biography, Arts and Entertainment, 2001.

Film Producer:

To Gillian on Her 37th Birthday, Triumph Releasing, 1996.

Lake Placid (also known as Lac Placid), Twentieth Century–Fox, 1999.

Mystery, Alaska, Buena Vista, 1999.

Film Appearances:

Himself, Frankie and Johnny Are Married, IFC Films, 2004.

WRITINGS

Teleplays; Series:

L.A. Law, NBC, 1986–91.

Picket Fences (some episodes also based on stories by Kelley), CBS, 1992–96.

(With others) Chicago Hope (some episodes also based on stories by Kelley), CBS, 1994–2000.

Ally McBeal (some episodes also based on stories by Kelley), Fox, 1997–2002.

The Practice (some episodes also based on stories by Kelley), ABC, 1997–2004.

Ally, Fox, 1999.

Boston Public (some episodes also based on stories by Kelley), Fox, 2000–2004.

(With others) Boston Legal (some episodes also based on stories by Kelley), ABC, beginning 2004.

Teleplays; Episodic:

(With Steven Bochco) "A Stitch Called Wanda," Doogie Howser, M.D., ABC, 1989.

(With Everett Owens) "Bedfellas," Snoops, ABC, 1999.

"Constitution," Snoops, ABC, 1999.

"The Grinch," Snoops, ABC, 1999.

"Singer in the Band," Snoops, ABC, 1999.

"Falling Acorns," The Brotherhood of Poland, New Hampshire (also known as The Brotherhood of Poland, N.H.), CBS, 2003.

"Little Girl Lost," The Brotherhood of Poland, New Hampshire (also known as The Brotherhood of Poland, N.H.), CBS, 2003.

"Sleeping Lions," The Brotherhood of Poland, New Hampshire (also known as The Brotherhood of Poland, N.H.), CBS, 2003.

"Tough Love," The Brotherhood of Poland, New Hampshire (also known as The Brotherhood of Poland, N.H.), CBS, 2003.

The Law Firm, NBC, 2005.

Teleplays; Pilots:

(With Steven Bochco) Doogie Howser, M.D., ABC, 1989.

Picket Fences, CBS, 1992.

Chicago Hope, CBS, 1994.

Mixed Nuts, NBC, 1996.

Ally McBeal, Fox, 1997.

The Practice, ABC, 1997.

Snoops, ABC, 1999.

Girls Club (also known as girls club), Fox, 2002.

Screenplays:

(With Bob Clark; and story) From the Hip, De Laurentiis Entertainment Group, 1987.

To Gillian on Her 37th Birthday (based on a play by Michael Brady), Triumph Releasing, 1996.

Lake Placid (also known as Lac Placid), Twentieth Century–Fox, 1999.

Mystery, Alaska, Buena Vista, 1999.

Chasing Montana, Focus Features, 2005.

OTHER SOURCES

Periodicals:

Broadcasting & Cable, May 1, 1995, p. 10; June 12, 1995, p. 16; February 1, 1999, p. 32; April 26, 1999, p. 29.

Entertainment Weekly, June 13, 1997, p. 13; September 25, 1998, pp. 32–40; January 22, 1999, p. 84; July 23, 1999, p. 45; September 10, 1999, p. 110; October 1, 1999, p. 58; February 11, 2000, p. 54; September 29, 2000, p. 42; November 3, 2000, p. 30; November 17, 2000, p. 103.

Mediaweek, October 23, 1995, p. 5.

People Weekly, October 19, 1998, p. 180; December 31, 1999, p. 84.

Time, May 31, 1999, p. 88.

U.S. News & World Report, November 20, 1995, p. 81; March 3, 1997, p. 75; May 31, 1999, p. 14.

Variety, June 14, 1999, p. 25; September 20, 1999, p. 36.

Washington Post, February 22, 1998, p. G1; September 13, 1999, p. C1.

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"Kelley, David E. 1956–." Contemporary Theatre, Film and Television. . Encyclopedia.com. 27 May. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"Kelley, David E. 1956–." Contemporary Theatre, Film and Television. . Encyclopedia.com. (May 27, 2017). http://www.encyclopedia.com/education/news-wires-white-papers-and-books/kelley-david-e-1956

"Kelley, David E. 1956–." Contemporary Theatre, Film and Television. . Retrieved May 27, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/education/news-wires-white-papers-and-books/kelley-david-e-1956