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Campbell-Martin, Tisha 1968–

Tisha Campbell-Martin 1968

Actress, singer

Overcame Shyness Through Performing

Won First Lead TV Role

Breakthrough Role on Martin

Left Martin After Conflict With Lawrence

Returned to Television With Kids

Selected works

Sources

Performer Tisha Campbell-Martin has made herself known to viewers, first, with acting credits in a series of successful films and, second, through lead roles in hit television series such as FOXs Martin and ABCs My Wife and Kids. More specifically, Campbell-Martin has appeared in films made by black filmmakers and marketed to largely black audiences. Consequently, the actress has been an important player in the fields of black film and television, in which the entertainment industry started investing during the last 20 years. Campbell-Martins success is, therefore, an analog and a tribute to the growing market-strength of African-American audiences.

Although she was actually born in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, on October 13, 1968, Campbell-Martin identified herself as a native of Newark, New Jersey, since the family moved to Newark before she turned three. She began singing as soon as she was capable of doing so and even entered her first talent contest at the age of sixalthough some reporters have pushed the event back three years, making the aspiring performer only three. She won the contest and took home first prizea Ford Grenada, for which she had little use.

After that auspicious beginning, young Campbell-Martin pursued more work in show business, making use of her proximity to New York City. My parents never forced me to go on auditionsI begged them to take me, she told Brenda Herrmann of the Chicago Tribune in March of 1993. She continued singing and, at seven, began acting professionally as well.

Overcame Shyness Through Performing

As the years went by, she accumulated more and more bit parts on Broadways kiddie circuit, appeared in The Magnificent Major in 1977, and procured television roles on after-school specials. Surprisingly, Campbell-Martin has described herself as a shy child and interpreted her drive to perform as a way of forcing herself out of that shyness. When I first entered the industry, I was so shy, she told Allison Samuels of Upscale. I didnt begin taking the industry seriously until I was about 15 years old. Up until then it was just something fun to do. During those teen years, she also won a place in the Arts High School in Newark, of which she told Robin Rauzi from the Los Angeles Times that Its not like Fame at all. Campbell-Martins first real break didnt come until

At a Glance

Born Tisha Campbell on October 13, 1968, in Oklahoma City, OK; daughter of Mona Campbell; married Duane Martin, 1996; children; Xen.

Career: Actress, 1974-; choreographer, 1990; recording artist, 1993; film director, 2001-; screenwriter, 2003-.

Addresses: Officec/o ABC Inc, Actress, My Wife and Kids, 5000 S. Buena Vista, Burbank, CA, 91521.

1986, when she was offered a small part in the film production of Little Shop of Horrors, based on the hit Broadway play.

Little Shops release in 1987 coincided with a more central role in a short-lived television series called Rags to Riches. Campbell-Martin was chosen to be one among five orphan girls around whom the show revolved; the five stars had initially competed with approximately 1,800 other aspiring performers in auditions that took place in New York City, Los Angeles, and Chicago. The show not only made use of Campbell-Martins acting abilities, but also included musical numbers that allowed the young performer to display her dancing and singing talents. A Variety reviewer noted Campbell-Martin as one of the most prominent among the quintet of teenage girls. Although the show received a fair amount of positive media, it didnt catch on with viewers and it wasnt Campbell-Martins key to show business fame.

While Rags to Riches was still in production, Campbell-Martin also assumed a lead role in black filmmaker Spike Lees School Daze, after Vanessa Williams, a former Miss America, decided she wasnt comfortable with the part. In a story that dealt with the sensitive topic of class and color politics on a black college campus, Campbell-Martin played the leader of a light-skinned sorority housethe wannabees, or want-to-be-whites. Consequently, her character would be a focal point for potential audience anger.

Being in School Daze was an experience like no other, Campbell-Martin told Upscale. I was really young, and the leading female character was a lot to handlenot to mention what the film was about. This put even more strain on me because it was such a controversial subject. Black audiences generally struggled with their reactions to the films painful topic. What the film tackled, according to Essences Bonnie Allen, was ultimately a conflict among Black Americans resulting from our steadfast refusal to confront our color consciousness and caste systems.

Won First Lead TV Role

Although the debate that School Daze generated tended to steal attention away from the work of the performers, the role was nonetheless a turning point in Campbell-Martins career. She was approached more and more often to lend her presence to projects made by black artists for black audiences. The first of these was a pilot for a new television series called Heart and Soul. Aired in the summer of 1988, Campbell-Martin had a leading role on the show. Greeted unfavorably by critics, the series never took off. Many reviewers did, however, note Campbell-Martins talent. Varietys reviewer, writing in 1988, commented on her refreshingly firm-but-sweet approach; meanwhile, the writer for People credited Campbell-Martin with bringing some calm humanity to this circus.

The real pay-off from School Daze came in a range of notable roles in a string of high-profile films. A leading role in House Party and House Party II introduced Campbell-Martin to the Hudlin brothers, two rising young producers whom a Newsweek reviewer predicted would follow Spike Lees success and reap big bucks from a wide multiracial audience. The same reviewer pegged Campbell-Martin as one of the dynamite dancers in the film. She interspersed this work with parts in superstar comic Eddie Murphys Another 48 Hours, released in 1990, and Boomerang, released in 1992.

Doing Boomerang was definitely a high point in my career, Campbell-Martin told Upscale. At first I wasnt even going to audition for the role because it was such a small part, and I felt Id been typecast as too much of a nice girl in my other films to get it anyway. Then I told myself to stop trippingwork is work, and I am glad I did it. People are always saying I was their favorite character even though I was only in three scenes of the film.

She had her first memorable introduction to television audiences in 1991, with a guest role on A Different World, NBCs long-running spin-off from The Cosby Show. Her part here also appealed to Campbell-Martins desire to do work with a social conscience, since the episode addressed the need to educate young people about the danger of AIDS. The pilot for Moes World, in which Campbell-Martin played a pregnant teenager, also addressed difficult social issues, butas with Campbell-Martins previous television experiencesnever got off the ground. Campbell-Martin mourned its ill fortune, since, as she explained to Upscale, it was probably one of the best pieces of work Ive done. It was such a positive piece about black life, but it was never given a chance because of politics. When youre a black actress, you take those things to heart because parts like that dont come everyday.

Breakthrough Role on Martin

Her television breakthrough came, instead, in the form of an offer from one of her former co-stars from House Party and Boomerang, Martin Lawrence. Having settled a contract with Fox Television for a comedy series, Lawrence needed an actress to play the part of the protagonists girlfriend, Genaa role that Deborah Gregory described in Essence as in-your-face. The first time we worked together in House Party, Campbell-Martin told Upscale, it worked well, so I knew this project would probably work because the chemistry was already there.

Campbell-Martin went on to express her excitement about Gena: Shes this upscale black woman, who has faults, but shes very strong and supportive of her man. The thing I love the most about her though, is that shes not a 25-year-old without a pastshes done her share of things and often spends the night with her boyfriend. I think thats more realistically in touch with todays young women. I think Gena will be seen as one of the best black female characters to come out in a while. Eventually, Martin became an unequivocal smash, in Gregorys words.

As soon as Campbell-Martin had established herself in American living rooms via Martin, she decided to find a venue for her other talents as well. A contract with Capitol Records in 1992, led to a 1993 debut album, Tisha. Janine McAdams, writing for Billboard, noted that the lead-off single has been shouldering its way into the top half of the Hot R&B Singles chart. Campbell-Martin was personally proud that the album included the first song she had ever written, Why Wont You Love Me, on which she collaborated with her mother, Mona Campbell. Furthermore, as Campbell-Martin told Billboard, she made a point of being involved in every part of the production, especially video. I go through directors reels and Im real clear about my visual image.

Jean Viggins, a vice president at Capitol, expressed appreciation for the performers expansive skills when he told McAdams that Tisha is probably the best-equipped artist across the board as far as stage presence, interviews, stage ability. I never had an opportunity to work with an artist that is so broad-based. Although the album didnt shake up the music world, several critics had praise for it. Unable to blast away with the sheer vocal power of some of her contemporaries, Mitchell May wrote in the Chicago Tribune, Tisha Campbell relies instead on a wonderful knack for phrasing that allows her to caress the notes of each ballad and give character to songs.

Left Martin After Conflict With Lawrence

Things seemed to be going perfectly for Campbell-Martin in the mid-1990s. She starred on one of the most popular shows on FOX, her singing career, while not blockbuster, was progressing slowly, and in January of 1996, she married Duane Martin, her boyfriend of six years, and star of the television series Out All Night and the film Above the Rim. But as Martin moved into its fifth season in 1997, tension began to build between Campbell-Martin and co-star Lawrence. According to Campbell-Martin in a lawsuit later filed against Lawrence and HBO, Lawrence was mentally unstable and had begun to sexually harass her, both in private and in public. Campbell-Martin went as far as to ask the writers to not write any scenes where her character and Lawrences character were physical in any way or appeared in any bedroom type setting. By November of 1996 the situation became too much for Campbell-Martin and she left the show, supposedly for good.

The HBO company which produced Martin knew that the show, which had only taped the first half of the fifth season, needed Campbell-Martin to proceed with the storyline that had been created for the characters by the writers, and they filed a temporary restraining order against Campbell-Martin in an attempt to force her back to the set to continue filming. However, U.S. District Judge Audrey Collins denied this restraining order in December of 1996. A month later, in January of 1997, Campbell-Martin fired back by suing both Lawrence and HBO for damages resulting from sexual harassment and battery. In her testimony Campbell-Martin claimed, according to Jet magazine, that Lawrences inappropriate behavior began in the shows second season in 1993 where Lawrence would fly into uncontrollable fits of rage for no apparent rational reason. By the third season Lawrence, humiliated and abused Campbell in front of the entire cast and crew on so many occasions that it reached the point where she needed to be hospitalized due to the stress he caused her. Finally, by the fourth season, the harassment became physical. According to Jet Lawrence again tried to force his tongue into Campbells mouth, simulated intercourse and forcibly touched her body, all against her will.

By March of 1997 the lawsuit was settled out of court and while the settlement was never disclosed by either HBO, FOX, or Campbell-Martin, Campbell-Martin did return to the Martin set to film the last three episodes of the fifth season with the strict understanding that she would not appear in any scenes with Lawrence. After the end of the fifth season, Campbell-Martin again quit the show, this time for good, and shortly after the show was dropped by FOX.

After leaving Martin, Campell-Martin appeared in the comedy film Sprung where she played a lawyer looking for love. She also appeared in the television movie The Sweetest Gift in 1998 as a country woman looking for companionship. While critics lauded both roles, neither movie gained any amount of success. Campell-Martin decided to return to her roots of dance and singing and performed in a few off-Broadway plays during 1999 and 2000 and many critics suspected that she had lost her love of television and film and would not soon return to either medium.

Returned to Television With Kids

Then, in 2001, Campbell-Martin tried out for Damon Wayanss new comedy on ABC called My Wife and Kids, a family show that dealt with real life issues and good moral parenting values, at the request of her husband Duane. She told Essence, Duane convinced me to go back. He missed that part of me. Many people assumed that the show would be like many other network offerings around that time, heavy on the racial issues that concern an African-American family and light on the day to day problems that effect all families. But as Campell-Martin told Essence, the series is about a family dealing with real issues. She went on to talk about how other shows such as The Hughleys, which many critics were quick to compare to My Wife and Kids, was a fish-out-of-water kind of thing. The only similarity is that were Black and have kids.

The critics soon came around to Campbell-Martins point of view. My Wife and Kids became a hit for ABC on Wednesday nights and became a staple comedy for the network to build around. In 2001 it was averaging a weekly audience of 12 million viewers. But the show was not the only success that Campbell-Martin was enjoying. In August of 2001 Martin-Campbell gave birth to the couples first child, Xen Martin. This does not mean, however, that Campell-Martin has slowed down. A few months after the birth of Xen, she was back at work on My Wife and Kids, was wrapping up shooting on a movie called The Last Place on Earth, and was also directing her first movie Get Up Stand Up Comedy. She was scheduled to appear on the upcoming third season of My Wife and Kids, and has also taken up screen writing with her first movie, The Seat Filler scheduled to appear in theaters in 2004.

Selected works

Albums

Tisha, Capitol, 1993.

Films

The Magnificent Major, 1977.

Little Shop of Horrors, 1986.

School Daze, 1988.

House Party, 1990.

Another 48 Hrs., 1990.

House Party 2, 1991.

Boomerang, 1992.

House Party 3, 1994.

Sprung, 1997.

(as director) Get Up Stand Up Comedy, 2001.

The Last Place on Earth, 2002.

(as screenwriter) The Seat Filler, 2004.

Television

Rags to Riches, NBC, 1987-88.

Martin, FOX, 1992-97.

The Sweetest Gift, Hallmark Entertainment Network, 1998.

My Wife and Kids, ABC, 2001-.

Sources

Periodicals

Billboard, January 30, 1993, p. 23.

Chicago Tribune, February 11, 1993, section 5, p. 7; March 2, 1993, section 5, p. 5.

Essence, February 1988, pp. 50-52, 130-32; May 1993, p. 52; March 2001, p. 10.

Jet, February 22, 1988, pp. 28-31; April 29, 1991, p. 52; March 8, 1993, pp. 56-58; February 21, 1994, pp. 56-58; September 4, 1995, pp. 12-14; January 27, 1997, pp. 34-36; August 27, 2001, p. 33; December 17, 2001, pp. 56-60.

Los Angeles Times, March 31, 1993, pp. F-l, F-8; January 7, 1997, p. 6.

Newsweek, March 26, 1990, p. 55.

People, January 12, 1987, p. 10; July 25, 1988, pp. 7-8.

People Weekly, January 20, 1997, p. 59-60; February 23, 1998, p. 18.

Star-Ledger (Newark, NJ), May 20, 1997, p. 25.

Teen Magazine, January 1988, p. 45.

Upscale, December/January, 1993, pp. 76-77.

Variety, March 25, 1987, p. 72; July 27, 1988, p. 50; May 19, 1997, p. 49; April 2, 2001, p. 27.

On-line

Tisha Campbell, Internet Movie Database, www.imdb.com (September 25, 2003).

Ondine Le Blanc and Ralph G. Zerbonia

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"Campbell-Martin, Tisha 1968–." Contemporary Black Biography. . Encyclopedia.com. 20 Aug. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

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Campbell, Tisha 1969–

Tisha Campbell 1969

Actress, singer

At a Glance

Starred in School Daze

Steady Work in Feature Films

A Hit on Fox

Sources

Performer Tisha Campbell has made herself known to viewers, first, with acting credits in a series of successful films and, second, through a lead role in Fox Televisions hit series Martin. More specifically, Campbell carries credits in films made by black filmmakers and marketed to largely black audiences. Consequently, the actress has been an important player in the fields of black film and television, in which the entertainment industry started investing during the last 20 years. Campbells success is, therefore, an analog and a tribute to the growing market-strength of African-American audiences.

Although she was actually born in Oklahoma, Campbell identifies herself as a native of Newark, New Jersey, since the family moved to Newark before she turned three. She began singing as soon as she was capable of doing so and even entered her first talent contest at the age of sixalthough some reporters have pushed the event back three years, making the aspiring performer only three. She won the contest and took home first prizea Ford Grenada, for which she had little use. After that auspicious beginning, young Campbell pursued more work in show business, making use of her proximity to New York City. My parents never forced me to go on auditionsI begged them to take me, she told Brenda Herrmann of the Chicago Tribune in March of 1993. She continued singing and, at seven, began acting professionally as well.

As the years went by, she accumulated more and more bit parts on Broadways kiddie circuit and procured television roles on after-school specials. Surprisingly, Campbell has described herself as a shy child and interprets her drive to perform as a way of forcing herself out of that shyness. When I first entered the industry, I was so shy, she told Allison Samuels of Upscale. I didnt begin taking the industry seriously until I was about 15 years old. Up until then it was just something fun to do. During those teen years, she also won a place in the Arts High School in Newark, of which she told Robin Rauzi from the Los Angeles Times that Its not like Fame at all. Campbells first real break didnt come until 1976, when she was offered a small part in the film production of Little Shop of Horrors, the hit Broadway play.

Little Shops release in 1987, coincided with a more central role in a short-lived television series called Rags to Riches. Campbell was chosen to be one among five orphan girls around whom the show revolved; the five stars had initially competed with approximately 1,800 other aspiring performers

At a Glance

Born Tisha Campbell, c 1969, in Oklahoma; daughter of Mona Campbell. Family moved to Newark, NJ, c. 1971.

Actress and singer. Sang in and won first singing contest at age of six, c. 1975. Pursued regular work on stage and television throughout childhood and teen years. Television appearances include Rags to Riches, 1987; Martin, 1992. Film appearances include Little Shop of Horrors, 1987; School Daze, 1988; Rooftops, 1989; House Party, 1990; House Party It, 1991; Another 48 Hours, 1990; Boomerang, 1992. Released album, Tisha, with Capitol Records, 1993.

Addresses: AgencyJane Frazier, Michelle Marx Inc., 8756 Holloway Drive, Los Angeles, CA 90069.

in auditions that took place in New York City, Los Angeles, and Chicago. The show not only made use of Campbells acting abilities, but also included musical numbers that allowed the young performer to display her dancing and singing talents. A Variety reviewer noted Campbell as one of the most prominent among the quintet of teenage girls. Although the show received a fair amount of positive media, it didnt catch on with viewers; it wasnt Campbells key to show business fame.

Starred in School Daze

While Rags to Riches was still in production, Campbell also assumed a lead role in black filmmaker Spike Lees School Daze, after Vanessa Williams, a former Miss America, decided she wasnt comfortable with the part. In a story that dealt with the sensitive topic of class and color politics on a black college campus, Campbell played the leader of a light-skinned sorority housethe wannabees, or want-to-be-whites. Consequently, her character would be a focal point for potential audience anger.

Being in School Daze was an experience like no other, Campbell told Samuels. I was really young, and the leading female character was a lot to handlenot to mention what the film was about. This put even more strain on me because it was such a controversial subject. Black audiences generally struggled with their reactions to the films painful topic. What the film tackled, according to Essences Bonnie Allen, was ultimately a conflict among black Americans resulting from our steadfast refusal to confront our color consciousness and caste systems.

Although the debate that School Daze generated tended to steal attention away from the work of the performers, the role was nonetheless a turning point in Campbells career. She was approached more and more often to lend her presence to projects made by black artists for black audiences. The first of these was a pilot for a new television series called Heart and Soul. Aired in the summer of 1988, Campbell had a leading role on the show. Greeted unfavorably by critics, the series never took off. Many reviewers did, however, note Campbells talent. Varietys reviewer, writing in 1988, commented on her refreshingly firm-but-sweet approach; meanwhile, the writer for People credited Campbell with bringing some calm humanity to this circus.

Steady Work in Feature Films

The real pay-off from School Daze came in a range of notable roles in a string of high-profile films. A leading role in House Party and House Party II introduced Campbell to the Hudlin brothers, two rising young producers whom a Newsweek reviewer predicted would follow Spike Lees success and reap big bucks from a wide multiracial audience. The same reviewer pegged Campbell as one of the dynamite dancers in the film. She interspersed this work with parts alongside superstar comic Eddie Murphy in Another 48 Hours, released in 1990, and Boomerang, released in 1992.

Doing Boomerang was definitely a high point in my career, Campbell told Samuels. At first I wasnt even going to audition for the role because it was such a small part, and I felt Id been typecast as too much of a nice girl in my other films to get it anyway. Then I told myself to stop trippingwork is work, and I am glad I did it. People are always saying I was their favorite character even though I was only in three scenes of the film.

She had her first memorable introduction to television audiences in 1991, with a guest role on A Different World, the networks long-running spin-off from The Cosby Show. Her part here also appealed to Campbells desire to do work with a social conscience, since the episode addressed the need to educate young people about the danger of AIDS. The pilot for Moes World, in which Campbell played a pregnant teenager, also addressed difficult social issues, butas with Campbells previous television experiencesnever got off the ground. Campbell mourned its ill-fortune, since, as she explained to Samuels, it was probably one of the best pieces of work Ive done. It was such a positive piece about black life, but it was never given a chance because of politics. When youre a black actress, you take those things to heart because parts like that dont come everyday.

A Hit on Fox

Her television breakthrough came, instead, in the form of an offer from one of her former co-stars from the House Party films and Boomerang, Martin Lawrence. Having settled a contract with Fox Television for a comedy series, Lawrence needed an actress to play the part of the protagonists girlfriend, Genaa role that Deborah Gregory described in Essence as in-your-face. The first time we worked together in House Party, Campbell told Samuels, it worked well, so I knew this project would probably work because the chemistry was already there.

Campbell went on to express her excitement about Gena: Shes this upscale black woman, who has faults, but shes very strong and supportive of her man. The thing I love the most about her though, is that shes not a 25-year-old without a pastshes done her share of things and often spends the night with her boyfriend. I think thats more realistically in touch with todays young women. I think Gena will be seen as one of the best black female characters to come out in a while. Eventually, Martin became an unequivocal smash, in Gregorys words.

As soon as Campbell had established herself in American living rooms via Martin, she decided to find a venue for her other talents as well. A contract with Capitol Records in 1992, led to a 1993 debut album, Tisha. Janine McAdams, writing for Billboard, noted that the lead-off single has been shouldering its way into the top half of the Hot R&B Singles chart. Campbell was personally proud that the album included the first song she had ever written, Why Wont You Love Me, on which she collaborated with her mother, Mona Campbell. Furthermore, as Campbell told McAdams, she made a point of being involved in every part of the production, especially video. I go through directors reels and Im real clear about my visual image.

Jean Viggins, a vice president at Capitol, expressed appreciation for the performers expansive skills when he told McAdams that Tisha is probably the best-equipped artist across the board as far as stage presence, interviews, stage ability. I never had an opportunity to work with an artist that is so broad-based. Although the album didnt shake up the music world, several critics had praise for it. Unable to blast away with the sheer vocal power of some of her contemporaries, Mitchell May wrote in the Chicago Tribune, Tisha Campbell relies instead on a wonderful knack for phrasing that allows her to caress the notes of each ballad and give character to songs.

By 1993, Campbell began talking about the possibility of expanding her work still further, looking forward to an opportunity to move behind the camera and start directing. As a black woman, she remarked to Samuels, I think its really good to get our stories out there and the only one who can tell them is us. When I get more time, I really want to learn more about directing so that if I ever get the opportunity, I can move in that direction. Ive been in this business long enough to know that the power is behind the camera.

Sources

Billboard, January 30, 1993, p. 23.

Chicago Tribune, February 11, 1993, section 5, p. 7; March 2, 1993, section 5, p. 5.

Essence, February 1988, pp. 50-2, 130-32; May 1993, p. 52.

Jet, February 22, 1988, pp. 28-31; April 29, 1991, p. 52; March 8, 1993, pp. 56-8; February 21, 1994, pp. 56-8.

Los Angeles Times, March 31, 1993, pp. F-l, F-8.

Newsweek, March 26, 1990, p. 55.

People, January 12, 1987, p. 10; July 25, 1988, pp. 7-8.

Teen Magazine, January 1988, p. 45.

Upscale, December/January, 1993, pp. 76-7.

Variety, March 25, 1987, p. 72; July 27, 1988, p. 50.

Ondine Le Blanc

Cite this article
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"Campbell, Tisha 1969–." Contemporary Black Biography. . Encyclopedia.com. 20 Aug. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"Campbell, Tisha 1969–." Contemporary Black Biography. . Encyclopedia.com. (August 20, 2017). http://www.encyclopedia.com/education/news-wires-white-papers-and-books/campbell-tisha-1969

"Campbell, Tisha 1969–." Contemporary Black Biography. . Retrieved August 20, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/education/news-wires-white-papers-and-books/campbell-tisha-1969

Campbell, Tisha 1968–

CAMPBELL, Tisha 1968–

(Tisha Campbell–Martin, Tisha Campbell Martin)

PERSONAL

Born October 13, 1968, in Oklahoma City, OK; raised in Newark, NJ; daughter of Clifton (a factory worker and singer) and Mona (a nurse, gospel singer, vocal coach, and talent manager; maiden name, Raye) Campbell; married Duane Martin (an actor), August 17, 1996; children: Xen Martin. Education: Graduated from Newark Arts High School in Newark, NJ. Avocational Interests: Boxing.

Addresses:

Agent—Paul Kohner Agency, 9300 Wilshire Blvd., Suite 555, Beverly Hills, CA 90212. Manager—Art/Work Entertainment, 260 S. Beverly Dr., Suite 205, Beverly Hills, CA 90212; Management 360, 9111 Wilshire Blvd., Beverly Hills, CA 90210. Publicist—Stan Rosenfield & Associates, Ltd., 2029 Century Park East, Suite 1190, Los Angeles, CA 90067.

Career:

Actress, writer, director, choreographer, dancer, and singer. With mother, started an independent record company; launched own line of jewelry, "Tisha's Collections."

Member:

Diva Simply Singing (group which raises money for minority AIDS projects), Alpha Kappa Alpha.

Awards, Honors:

Independent Spirit Award nomination, best supporting female, 1991, for House Party; Image Award nominations, outstanding lead actress in a comedy series, National Association for the Advancement of Colored People, 1996, 1997, both for Martin; Image Award nominations, outstanding actress in a comedy series, 2002, 2004, Image Award, outstanding actress in a comedy series, 2003, all for My Wife and Kids.

CREDITS

Film Appearances:

Daisy Bunsen, The Magnificent Major, Viacom, 1977.

Chiffon, Little Shop of Horrors, Warner Bros., 1986.

Jane Toussaint, School Daze, Columbia, 1988.

Amber and song performer, Rooftops, New Visions, 1989.

Amy Smith, Another 48 Hrs., Paramount, 1990.

Sidney, House Party, New Line Cinema, 1990.

Jiwanda, Moe's World, 1990.

Sidney, House Party 2, New Line Cinema, 1991.

Yvonne, Boomerang, Paramount, 1992.

Sidney, House Party 3, New Line Cinema, 1994.

Voice of Sledge, Homeward Bound II: Lost in San Francisco (also known as Homeward Bound II: Incredible Journey), Buena Vista, 1996.

Steimer, Snitch, Cargo Films, 1996.

Brandy, Sprung, Trimark Pictures, 1997.

Ann Field, The Last Place on Earth, 2002.

Film Work:

Choreographer of dance battle, House Party, New Line, 1990.

Director, Get Up Stand Up Comedy, 2001.

Television Appearances; Series:

Herself, The Big Blue Marble, PBS, 1974.

Marva Foley, Rags to Riches, NBC, 1987–88.

Gina Waters (later Payne), Martin, Fox, 1992–97.

Rosalee Lincoln, Linc's, Showtime, 1998.

(As Tisha Martin–Campbell) Janet "Jay" Marie Kyle, My Wife and Kids, ABC, 2001—.

Television Appearances; Movies:

Ruby Wilson, The Sweetest Gift, Nickelodeon, 1998.

Television Appearances; Pilots:

Marva Foley, Rags to Riches (also known as Foley and the Girls from St. Mags), NBC, 1986.

Jamie Sinclair, Heart and Soul, NBC, 1988.

Jiwanda, Moe's World, ABC, 1992.

Television Appearances; Specials:

"Unicorn Tales," ABC AfterSchool Specials, ABC, c. 1975.

The 19th Annual Black Filmmakers Hall of Fame, syndicated, 1992.

Host, Fox New Year's Eve Live, Fox, 1992.

GED—Get It!, PBS, 1993.

Comic Relief VI, HBO, 1994.

Cohost, Smart Kids, Fox, 1994.

Host, For Better or for Worse: The World's Funniest Wedding Disasters, Fox, 1995.

The Soul Train 25th Anniversary Hall of Fame Special, CBS, 1995.

Host, The Best of Martin, Fox, 1996.

Herself, Intimate Portrait: Pam Grier (documentary), Lifetime, 1999.

Voice of Goldie, The Steadfast Tin Soldier: An Animated Special from the "Happily Ever After: Fairy Tales for Every Child" Series (animated), HBO, 2000.

(Uncredited; in archive footage) Janet Kyle, The Victoria's Secret Fashion Show, ABC, 2001.

(As Tisha Campbell–Martin) Herself, It's Black Entertainment (documentary), Showtime, 2002.

Herself, Intimate Portrait: Tisha Campbell–Martin (documentary), Lifetime, 2002.

All ABC Bloopers, ABC, 2003.

Television Appearances; Awards Presentations:

The 26th Annual NAACP Image Awards, NBC, 1994.

The 27th Annual NAACP Image Awards, Fox, 1996.

The 11th Annual Soul Train Music Awards, The WB, 1997.

The 2nd Annual Family Television Awards, CBS, 2000.

Presenter, The 30th Annual American Music Awards, ABC, 2003.

The 9th Annual Lady of Soul Train Awards, The WB, 2003.

The 35th Annual NAACP Image Awards, Fox, 2004.

Presenter, BET Comedy Awards, Black Entertainment Television, 2004.

Television Appearances; Episodic:

Josie Webb, "How Great Thou Art," A Different World, NBC, 1991.

Josie Webb, "If I Should Die Before I Wake," A Different World, NBC, 1991.

Kathleen, Will's girlfriend, "Did the Earth Move for You?," The Fresh Prince of Bel–Air, NBC, 1991.

Toni, "Here Comes the Buzz!," Blossom, NBC, 1991.

Toni, "To Tell the Truth," Blossom, NBC, 1991.

Angela Kimbro, "A Piece of the Roc," Roc, Fox, 1992.

Guest, Soul Train, 1993.

Host, Soul Train, 1994, 1995.

Voice of Rapunzel, "Rapunzel," Happily Ever After: Fairy Tales for Every Child (animated), HBO, 1995.

Voice of Ebony Sable, "Ebony, Baby," Duckman (animated), USA Network, 1997.

Herself, The Rosie O'Donnell Show, syndicated, 1997.

Daisy, "Dusty's in Love," Between Brothers, Fox, 1997.

Michelle/Sandy, "Milo Does the Darndest Things," Getting Personal, Fox, 1998.

"A Sandpiper to Bring You Joy/The Cape/Starlight, Starbright/The Gift …," Chicken Soup for the Soul, 1999.

Voice of Nicole, "New Kids on the Planet: Part 1," Cousin Skeeter, Nickelodeon, 2000.

(As Tisha Campbell Martin) Joyce, "The Halloween Scene," Sabrina, the Teenage Witch, The WB, 2000.

Voice of Nicole, "Mr. Big," Cousin Skeeter, Nickelodeon, 2002.

Voice of Nicole, "Radio Daze," Cousin Skeeter, Nickelodeon, 2002.

Voice of Nicole, "Bellboyz in the Hood," Cousin Skeeter, Nickelodeon, 2002.

Voice of Rene, "There's Something about Rene," The Proud Family (animated), 2003.

Herself, Ripley's Believe It or Not, 2003.

The Wayne Brady Show, 2003.

Guest cohost, The View, 2003.

(As Tisha Campbell–Martin) Herself, The Sharon Osbourne Show, syndicated, 2004.

(As Tisha Campbell–Martin) Guest cohost, The Sharon Osbourne Show, syndicated, 2004.

Carmen, Robert's sister, "A Family Affair," AllofUs, UPN, 2004.

Herself, Punk'd, MTV, 2004.

Also appeared in Wonderama; Crossing Over with John Edward; as Loraleen, "What I Did for Love," You Take the Kids; Olivia, Vince's wife, "The Object of My Affection," Wasteland.

Stage Appearances:

Rosie, Really Rosie (based on Maurice Sendak's book The Sign on Rosie's Door), New York City, 1980.

Chiffon, Little Shop of Horrors, New York City, 1986.

Appeared in Betsy Brown and Mama, I Want to Sing.

RECORDINGS

Albums:

(With others) Little Shop of Horrors, Geffen, 1986.

Tisha, Capitol Records, 1996.

Music Videos:

Appeared in "Push"; "Will 2K" and "Wild Wild West" by Will Smith; "You're Makin' Me High" by Toni Braxton.

WRITINGS

Screenplays:

(As Tisha Campbell–Martin) The Seat Filler, 2004.

OTHER SOURCES

Books:

Contemporary Black Biography, Volume 8, 1994, Volume 42, Gale Group, 2004.

Periodicals:

Chicago Tribune, August 31, 1993, section 7, p. 7.

Ebony, February, 2002, p. 70.

Jet, March 8, 1993, p. 56; September 4, 1995, p. 12; January 27, 1997, p. 34; June 2, 2003, p. 25; July 12, 2004, p. 56.

Los Angeles Times, March 31, 1993, p. F1.

People, December 5, 1994, p. 83; January 20, 1997, pp. 59–60; October 22, 2001, p. 164; December 8, 2003, p. 177.

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"Campbell, Tisha 1968–." Contemporary Theatre, Film and Television. . Encyclopedia.com. 20 Aug. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"Campbell, Tisha 1968–." Contemporary Theatre, Film and Television. . Encyclopedia.com. (August 20, 2017). http://www.encyclopedia.com/education/news-wires-white-papers-and-books/campbell-tisha-1968

"Campbell, Tisha 1968–." Contemporary Theatre, Film and Television. . Retrieved August 20, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/education/news-wires-white-papers-and-books/campbell-tisha-1968