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splint

splint, rigid or semiflexible device for the immobilization of displaced or fractured parts of the body. Most commonly employed for fractures of bones, a splint may be a first-aid measure that allows the patient to be moved without displacing the injured part, or it may be a means of fixation to immobilize the bones until healing is complete. Any material that offers the degree of resistance required may be used for a temporary splint, e.g., cloth, gauze, plaster, or metal. Splints made of plastic and fiberglass are now molded to fit specific parts of the body. Air splints are made of rubber or plastic that can be blown up to effectively immobilize a limb.

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splint

splint / splint/ • n. 1. a strip of rigid material used for supporting and immobilizing a broken bone when it has been set: she had to wear splints on her legs. 2. a long, thin strip of wood used to light a fire. ∎  a rigid or flexible strip, esp. of wood, used in basketwork. 3. a bony enlargement on the inside of a horse's leg, on the splint bone. • v. [tr.] secure (a broken limb) with a splint or splints: his leg was splinted.

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"splint." The Oxford Pocket Dictionary of Current English. . Encyclopedia.com. 23 Jan. 2018 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

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splint

splint plate of overlapping metal in medieval armour XIII; slender or thin slip of wood, etc.; (dial.) splinter XIV; (in farriery) tumour developing into a bony excrescence XVI; laminated coal XVIII. — MLG. splente, splinte, MDu. splinte (Du. splint); rel. to next
.

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"splint." The Concise Oxford Dictionary of English Etymology. . Encyclopedia.com. 23 Jan. 2018 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

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splint

splint (splint) n. a rigid appliance (orthosis) used to support or hold a limb or digit in position until healing of a fracture, dislocation, or soft-tissue injury has occurred.

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splint

splintacquaint, ain't, attaint, complaint, constraint, distraint, faint, feint, paint, plaint, quaint, restraint, saint, taint •spray-paint • greasepaint • warpaint •asquint, bint, clint, dint, flint, glint, hint, imprint, lint, mint, misprint, print, quint, skint, splint, sprint, squint, stint, tint •Septuagint • skinflint • catmint •varmint • spearmint • calamint •peppermint • enprint • screen print •offprint • blueprint • newsprint •footprint • thumbprint • fingerprint •monotint • mezzotint • aquatint •pint • Geraint •Comte, conte, font, fount, pont, quant, Vermont, want •Delfont • vicomte • Frémont •piedmont • Beaumont • Hellespont •passant • poste restante •avaunt, daunt, flaunt, gaunt, haunt, jaunt, taunt, vaunt

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