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LEXIS

LEXIS. A term in especially British LINGUISTICS for the VOCABULARY of a language or sub-language, consisting especially of its stock of LEXEMES. The term became popular because it is unambiguous, unlike LEXICON, and is GREEK in origin (fitting well with such other terms of Greek origin as phonology and syntax), in contrast with Latin-derived vocabulary (associated with Latinate pronunciation and Greco-Latin grammar).

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"LEXIS." Concise Oxford Companion to the English Language. . Encyclopedia.com. 19 Aug. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"LEXIS." Concise Oxford Companion to the English Language. . Encyclopedia.com. (August 19, 2017). http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/encyclopedias-almanacs-transcripts-and-maps/lexis

"LEXIS." Concise Oxford Companion to the English Language. . Retrieved August 19, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/encyclopedias-almanacs-transcripts-and-maps/lexis

lexis

lex·is / ˈleksis/ • n. the total stock of words in a language: a notable loss of English lexis. ∎  the level of language consisting of vocabulary, as opposed to grammar or syntax.

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"lexis." The Oxford Pocket Dictionary of Current English. . Encyclopedia.com. 19 Aug. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"lexis." The Oxford Pocket Dictionary of Current English. . Encyclopedia.com. (August 19, 2017). http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/lexis

"lexis." The Oxford Pocket Dictionary of Current English. . Retrieved August 19, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/lexis