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goblin

goblin a mischievous, ugly, dwarf-like creature of folklore. The word is Middle English and from Old French gobelin, possibly related to German (see kobold) or Greek kobalos ‘mischievous goblin’. In medieval Latin Gobelinus occurs as the name of a mischievous spirit, said to haunt Évreux in northern France in the 12th century.

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"goblin." The Oxford Dictionary of Phrase and Fable. . Encyclopedia.com. 21 Oct. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"goblin." The Oxford Dictionary of Phrase and Fable. . Encyclopedia.com. (October 21, 2017). http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/goblin

"goblin." The Oxford Dictionary of Phrase and Fable. . Retrieved October 21, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/goblin

goblin

goblin or hobgoblin, in French folklore, small household spirit, similar to the Celtic brownie. Goblins perform household tasks but also can make mischief, such as pulling the covers off sleepers. They like wine and pretty children.

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"goblin." The Columbia Encyclopedia, 6th ed.. . Encyclopedia.com. 21 Oct. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"goblin." The Columbia Encyclopedia, 6th ed.. . Encyclopedia.com. (October 21, 2017). http://www.encyclopedia.com/reference/encyclopedias-almanacs-transcripts-and-maps/goblin

"goblin." The Columbia Encyclopedia, 6th ed.. . Retrieved October 21, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/reference/encyclopedias-almanacs-transcripts-and-maps/goblin

Goblin

Goblin

A spirit formerly supposed to lurk in houses. Goblins were generally of a mischievous and grotesque nature. Hobgoblins, according to Junius, were so called because they used to hop on one leg.

(See also fairies )

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"Goblin." Encyclopedia of Occultism and Parapsychology. . Encyclopedia.com. 21 Oct. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"Goblin." Encyclopedia of Occultism and Parapsychology. . Encyclopedia.com. (October 21, 2017). http://www.encyclopedia.com/science/encyclopedias-almanacs-transcripts-and-maps/goblin

"Goblin." Encyclopedia of Occultism and Parapsychology. . Retrieved October 21, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/science/encyclopedias-almanacs-transcripts-and-maps/goblin

goblin

goblin XIV. prob. — AN. *gobelin (recorded in F. XV and surviving in Norman dial.), medL. gobelīnus; prob. appellative use of a proper name, dim. of Gobel (now Gobeau), app. rel. to kobold (see COBALT).

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"goblin." The Concise Oxford Dictionary of English Etymology. . Encyclopedia.com. 21 Oct. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"goblin." The Concise Oxford Dictionary of English Etymology. . Encyclopedia.com. (October 21, 2017). http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/goblin-2

"goblin." The Concise Oxford Dictionary of English Etymology. . Retrieved October 21, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/goblin-2

goblin

gob·lin / ˈgäblin/ • n. a mischievous, ugly, dwarflike creature of folklore.

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"goblin." The Oxford Pocket Dictionary of Current English. . Encyclopedia.com. 21 Oct. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"goblin." The Oxford Pocket Dictionary of Current English. . Encyclopedia.com. (October 21, 2017). http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/goblin-1

"goblin." The Oxford Pocket Dictionary of Current English. . Retrieved October 21, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/goblin-1

goblin

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"goblin." Oxford Dictionary of Rhymes. . Encyclopedia.com. 21 Oct. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

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"goblin." Oxford Dictionary of Rhymes. . Retrieved October 21, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/goblin-0