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Massachuset

Massachuset

The Massachuset, with the Nauset (Cape Indians), Nipmuc, Wampanoag, and Natick (Praying Indians), lived in eastern Massachusetts south to the eastern shores of Narragansett Bay. Descendants of these groups now live in the Nipmuc Community near Worcester, Massachusetts, on Martha's Vineyard, Massachusetts (Gay Head), and on Cape Cod, Massachusetts (Mashpee). They spoke Algonkian languages and now number about eight hundred.


Bibliography

Conkey, Laura E., Ethel Boissevain, and Ives Goddard (1978). "Indians of Southern New England: Late Period." In Handbook of North American Indians. Vol. 15, Northeast, edited by Bruce G. Trigger, 177-189. Washington, D.C.: Smithsonian Institution.

Salwen, Bert (1978). "Indians of Southern New England and Long Island: Early Period." In Handbook of North American Indians. Vol. 15, Northeast, edited by Bruce G. Trigger, 160-176. Washington, D.C.: Smithsonian Institution.

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"Massachuset." Encyclopedia of World Cultures. . Encyclopedia.com. 20 Nov. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

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"Massachuset." Encyclopedia of World Cultures. . Retrieved November 20, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/encyclopedias-almanacs-transcripts-and-maps/massachuset

Massachuset

Massachuset (măsəchōō´sĬt), Native North Americans whose language belongs to the Algonquian branch of the Algonquian-Wakashan linguistic stock (see Native American languages). In the early 17th cent. they occupied the territory around Massachusetts Bay and ranged northward. They then numbered some 3,000, but by 1631, after wars and pestilence, they were reduced to some 500. Soon thereafter they adopted Christianity and moved, with other converts, into the villages of the praying Indians. Here they ceased to have a separate tribal existence. The Massachuset owned and occupied the site of Boston.

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"Massachuset." The Columbia Encyclopedia, 6th ed.. . Encyclopedia.com. 20 Nov. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"Massachuset." The Columbia Encyclopedia, 6th ed.. . Encyclopedia.com. (November 20, 2017). http://www.encyclopedia.com/reference/encyclopedias-almanacs-transcripts-and-maps/massachuset

"Massachuset." The Columbia Encyclopedia, 6th ed.. . Retrieved November 20, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/reference/encyclopedias-almanacs-transcripts-and-maps/massachuset