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range

range / rānj/ • n. 1. the area of variation between upper and lower limits on a particular scale: the cost is thought to be in the range of $1-5 million a day it's outside my price range. ∎  a set of different things of the same general type: the area offers a wide range of activities for the tourist. ∎  the scope of a person's knowledge or abilities: he gave some indication of his range. ∎  the compass of a person's voice or of a musical instrument: she was gifted with an incredible vocal range. ∎  the extent of time covered by something such as a forecast. See also long-range, short-range. ∎  the area or extent covered by or included in something: an introductory guide to the range of debate this issue has generated. ∎  Math. the set of values that a given function can take as its argument varies. 2. the distance within which a person can see or hear: something lurked just beyond her range of vision. ∎  the maximum distance at which a radio transmission can be effectively received: planets within radio range of Earth. ∎  the distance that can be covered by a vehicle or aircraft without refueling: the vans have a range of 125 miles. ∎  the maximum distance to which a gun will shoot or over which a missile will travel: a duck came within range | these rockets have a range of 30 to 40 miles. ∎  the distance between a gun, missile, shot, or blow and its objective: a dog sidled up to them, stopping just out of range of a kick. ∎  the distance between a camera and the subject to be photographed. ∎ Surveying the horizontal direction and length of a survey line determined by at least two fixed points. 3. a line or series of mountains or hills: the coastal ranges of the northwest. ∎  a series of townships extending north and south parallel to the principal meridian of a survey. ∎  Naut. a line defined by landmarks or beacons, used to locate something offshore, esp. a navigable channel or a hazard. 4. a large area of open land for grazing or hunting. ∎  an area of land or sea used as a testing ground for military equipment. ∎  an open or enclosed area with targets for shooting practice. ∎  the area over which a thing, esp. a plant or animal, is distributed. 5. an electric or gas stove with several burners and one or more ovens. 6. Building a course of masonry extending from end to end at one height. ∎  a row of buildings. 7. archaic the direction or position in which something lies: the range of the hills and valleys is nearly from north to south. • v. 1. [intr.] vary or extend between specified limits: patients whose ages ranged from 13 to 25 years. 2. [tr.] (usu. be ranged) place or arrange in a row or rows or in a specified order or manner: a table with half a dozen chairs ranged around it. ∎  [intr.] run or extend in a line in a particular direction: he regularly came to the benches that ranged along the path. 3. [intr.] (of a person or animal) travel or wander over a wide area: patrols ranged thousands of miles deep into enemy territory | [tr.] nomadic tribesmen who ranged the windswept lands of the steppe. ∎  (of a person's eyes) pass from one person or thing to another: his eyes ranged over them. ∎  (of something written or spoken) cover or embrace a wide number of different topics: tutorials ranged over a variety of subjects. 4. [intr.] obtain the range of a target by adjustment after firing past it or short of it, or by the use of radar or laser equipment: radar-type transmissions which appeared to be ranging on our convoys. ∎  (of a projectile) cover a specified distance. ∎  (of a gun) send a projectile over a specified distance. PHRASES: at a range of with a specified distance between one person or thing and another: a bat can detect a moth at a range of less than 8 feet.

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"range." The Oxford Pocket Dictionary of Current English. . Encyclopedia.com. 22 Aug. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"range." The Oxford Pocket Dictionary of Current English. . Encyclopedia.com. (August 22, 2017). http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/range-1

"range." The Oxford Pocket Dictionary of Current English. . Retrieved August 22, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/range-1

range

range, large area of land unsuited to cultivation but supporting native grasses and other plants suitable for livestock grazing. Principal areas in the western hemisphere are the pampas of South America and the prairies of the United States and Canada. Originally the entire ranges of the W United States and Canada were unfenced public land. Under the Homestead Act (1862), more than 50% of the Western range land in the United States passed to private ownership and was fenced with barbed wire. The national forests and other public lands of the West still contain vast unfenced ranges; grazing permits are purchased by ranch owners. Ranges are known as summer or winter ranges according to the time of year when grazing conditions are best. Range management involves regulation of grazing and other economically productive uses of range land to prevent overgrazing or other abuse of the resource.

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"range." The Columbia Encyclopedia, 6th ed.. . Encyclopedia.com. 22 Aug. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"range." The Columbia Encyclopedia, 6th ed.. . Encyclopedia.com. (August 22, 2017). http://www.encyclopedia.com/reference/encyclopedias-almanacs-transcripts-and-maps/range

"range." The Columbia Encyclopedia, 6th ed.. . Retrieved August 22, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/reference/encyclopedias-almanacs-transcripts-and-maps/range

range

range
A. †rank, file XIII; row, line, series XVI;

B. moving about over an area; area itself XV; extent over which a missile ranges XVI; scope XVII.

C. form of fire-grate or cooking apparatus XV. — OF. range row, rank, file, f. ranger (f. rang RANK1). whence range vb. place in a line, arrange, dispose XIV, take up a position, extend XVI, move over a certain area XVI.
Hence ranger (arch.) gamekeeper XV; wanderer XVI; (esp. U.S.) pl. body of mounted troops XVIII.

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"range." The Concise Oxford Dictionary of English Etymology. . Encyclopedia.com. 22 Aug. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"range." The Concise Oxford Dictionary of English Etymology. . Encyclopedia.com. (August 22, 2017). http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/range-2

"range." The Concise Oxford Dictionary of English Etymology. . Retrieved August 22, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/range-2

range

range
1. of a binary relation R, a subset of S1 × S2, say. The subset of S2 consisting of all elements to which some element of S1 is related. If R is the relation “is the wife of” defined from men to women, the range of R is the set of married women.

Since a function is a special kind of relation, the range of f : XY

can be written as {y | yY and y = f(x) for some x in X}

2. See measures of variation.

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"range." A Dictionary of Computing. . Encyclopedia.com. 22 Aug. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"range." A Dictionary of Computing. . Encyclopedia.com. (August 22, 2017). http://www.encyclopedia.com/computing/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/range

"range." A Dictionary of Computing. . Retrieved August 22, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/computing/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/range

Range

Range

a series of things; a row, line, or file.

Examples : range of beehives, 1836; of books, 1863; of buildings, 1618; of campfires, 1677; of cliffs, 1859; of colours; of emotions; of hunters; of islands, 1748; of ladies, 1760; of morasses, 1791; of mountains, 1705; of oars, 1652; of outbuildings; of ovens; of pillars, 1511; of piles; of pupils, 1847; of soldiers; of trees, 1695; of vases, 1786.

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"Range." Dictionary of Collective Nouns and Group Terms. . Encyclopedia.com. 22 Aug. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"Range." Dictionary of Collective Nouns and Group Terms. . Encyclopedia.com. (August 22, 2017). http://www.encyclopedia.com/education/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/range-0

"Range." Dictionary of Collective Nouns and Group Terms. . Retrieved August 22, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/education/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/range-0

range

range In radar terminology, the distance of radar propagation. In order to avoid interference between consecutive electromagnetic pulses, the interval between pulses must be adequate to allow the return of the previous pulse. Pulse frequency is inversely proportional to the range. Range is measured as either slant range or ground range.

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"range." A Dictionary of Earth Sciences. . Encyclopedia.com. 22 Aug. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"range." A Dictionary of Earth Sciences. . Encyclopedia.com. (August 22, 2017). http://www.encyclopedia.com/science/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/range

"range." A Dictionary of Earth Sciences. . Retrieved August 22, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/science/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/range

range

range
1. The spread of environmental conditions within which a particular species occurs.

2. Extensive, open grazing lands.

3. See home range.

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"range." A Dictionary of Ecology. . Encyclopedia.com. 22 Aug. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"range." A Dictionary of Ecology. . Encyclopedia.com. (August 22, 2017). http://www.encyclopedia.com/science/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/range-0

"range." A Dictionary of Ecology. . Retrieved August 22, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/science/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/range-0

range

range.
1. Course of stone in a straight line.

2. Several bodies standing in a given plane, such as columns forming a colonnade.

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"range." A Dictionary of Architecture and Landscape Architecture. . Encyclopedia.com. 22 Aug. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"range." A Dictionary of Architecture and Landscape Architecture. . Encyclopedia.com. (August 22, 2017). http://www.encyclopedia.com/education/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/range

"range." A Dictionary of Architecture and Landscape Architecture. . Retrieved August 22, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/education/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/range

range

range
1. The spread of environmental conditions within which a particular species occurs

2. Extensive, open grazing lands.

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"range." A Dictionary of Plant Sciences. . Encyclopedia.com. 22 Aug. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"range." A Dictionary of Plant Sciences. . Encyclopedia.com. (August 22, 2017). http://www.encyclopedia.com/science/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/range-1

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range

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"range." A Dictionary of Sociology. . Encyclopedia.com. 22 Aug. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"range." A Dictionary of Sociology. . Encyclopedia.com. (August 22, 2017). http://www.encyclopedia.com/social-sciences/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/range

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range

range See HOME RANGE.

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"range." A Dictionary of Zoology. . Encyclopedia.com. 22 Aug. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"range." A Dictionary of Zoology. . Encyclopedia.com. (August 22, 2017). http://www.encyclopedia.com/science/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/range-2

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rangé

rangéaffray, agley, aka, allay, Angers, A-OK, appellation contrôlée, array, assay, astray, au fait, auto-da-fé, away, aweigh, aye, bay, belay, betray, bey, Bombay, Bordet, boulevardier, bouquet, brae, bray, café au lait, Carné, cassoulet, Cathay, chassé, chevet, chez, chiné, clay, convey, Cray, crème brûlée, crudités, cuvée, cy-pres, day, decay, deejay, dégagé, distinguée, downplay, dray, Dufay, Dushanbe, eh, embay, engagé, essay, everyday, faraway, fay, fey, flay, fray, Frey, fromage frais, gainsay, gay, Gaye, Genet, gilet, glissé, gray, grey, halfway, hay, heigh, hey, hooray, Hubei, Hué, hurray, inveigh, jay, jeunesse dorée, José, Kay, Kaye, Klee, Kray, Lae, lay, lei, Littré, Lough Neagh, lwei, Mae, maguey, Malay, Mallarmé, Mandalay, Marseilles, may, midday, midway, mislay, misplay, Monterrey, Na-Dene, nay, né, née, neigh, Ney, noway, obey, O'Dea, okay, olé, outlay, outplay, outstay, outweigh, oyez, part-way, pay, Pei, per se, pince-nez, play, portray, pray, prey, purvey, qua, Quai d'Orsay, Rae, rangé, ray, re, reflet, relevé, roman-à-clef, Santa Fé, say, sei, Shar Pei, shay, slay, sleigh, sley, spae, spay, Spey, splay, spray, stay, straightaway, straightway, strathspey, stray, Sui, survey, sway, Taipei, Tay, they, today, tokay, Torbay, Tournai, trait, tray, trey, two-way, ukiyo-e, underlay, way, waylay, Wei, weigh, wey, Whangarei, whey, yea

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"rangé." Oxford Dictionary of Rhymes. . Encyclopedia.com. 22 Aug. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

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range

rangeFalange, flange •avenge, henge, revenge, Stonehenge •arrange, change, counterchange, estrange, exchange, grange, interchange, Lagrange, mange, part-exchange, range, short-change, strange •binge, cringe, fringe, hinge, impinge, singe, springe, swinge, syringe, tinge, twinge, whinge •challenge • orange • scavenge •lozenge • blancmange •lounge, scrounge •blunge, expunge, grunge, gunge, lunge, plunge, scunge, sponge

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"range." Oxford Dictionary of Rhymes. . Encyclopedia.com. 22 Aug. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

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"range." Oxford Dictionary of Rhymes. . Retrieved August 22, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/range-0